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Ancestors of Christine Joyce Chapman

 

Generation No. 1

1. Christine Joyce Chapman, born Aug 18, 1929; died Jun 16, 1998 in Washington, Knox, Maine, United States of America. She was the daughter of 2. LaForrest Lincoln Chapman and 3. Geneva Margaret Leigher. She married (1) Edward Joseph Castater in Boston, Massachusetts. He was born Sep 16, 1924 in 187 Smith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts, and died Oct 17, 1995 in Suffolk, Massachusetts. He was the son of Edward Morris Castater and Evelyn Bechard. She married (2) Frank Lester Mank Jan 09, 1953. He was born Jul 29, 1934 in Camden, Maine. He was the son of Elwin Sylvester Mank and Mary Ethel Meservey.

More About Christine Joyce Chapman:

Burial: Lewiston, Maine

Cause of Death: cancer

Education: LPN

Social Security Number: 004-26-9190

SSN issued: Maine

More About Edward Joseph Castater:

Cause of Death: cancer

Occupation: Cook in Womens Shelter, Boston, Maine

Social Security Number: 030-14-3550

SSN issued: Massachusetts

Generation No. 2

2. LaForrest Lincoln Chapman, born Apr 06, 1904 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Aug 04, 1977 in Rockland, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 4. Cavalier Houdlette Chapman and 5. Nellie Ann Leavitte. He married 3. Geneva Margaret Leigher May 05, 1929.

3. Geneva Margaret Leigher, born Jun 24, 1911 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Oct 06, 1970 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. She was the daughter of 6. William L Leigher and 7. Isa Alberta Jones.

Notes for LaForrest Lincoln Chapman:

 

Forrest left home at age of 14 and went to work in a lumber mill. He at one point was a foreman in a lumber camp in the northern regions of Maine. Later he was able to get his own mill in Washington. This mill was a steam mill located on Washington Pond where Roland Moody's A frame house is located now. After that he purchased a diesel motor to run his mill and moved the lot to Waldoboro, Liberty, South China and Whitefield. After that he placed the mill across from his home and had logs trucked in. The mill was moved a final time to Muddy Road off 105 until he retired. His home was on the hill of Route 105 on the Mountain Road, where he also grew blueberries. Forrest was a very big man being 6 feet 8 inches. He was also a very proud man.

 

 

More About LaForrest Lincoln Chapman:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Knox County, Maine

Occupation: Lumberjack, Millman

More About Geneva Margaret Leigher:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Knox County, Maine

Occupation: owned Washington store " Chapman's"

Children of LaForrest Chapman and Geneva Leigher are:

1 i. Christine Joyce Chapman, born Aug 18, 1929; died Jun 16, 1998 in Washington, Knox, Maine, United States of America; married (1) Edward Joseph Castater in Boston, Massachusetts; married (2) Frank Lester Mank Jan 09, 1953.

ii. Victor Lee Chapman, born Oct 06, 1930 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died May 25, 2005 in Augusta, Maine.

More About Victor Lee Chapman:

Burial: Marr Cemetery, Washington, Knox County, Maine

Education: Nurse at Togas Hospitol, Augusta, Maine after returning to school

Occupation: Worked in father's sawmills, ran store " Chapman's"

 

Generation No. 3

4. Cavalier Houdlette Chapman, born Nov 18, 1857; died May 25, 1941. He was the son of 8. Zebediah Chapman and 9. Sarah Elizabeth Blair. He married 5. Nellie Ann Leavitte Nov 12, 1893.

5. Nellie Ann Leavitte, born Jan 23, 1877; died May 25, 1956 in Gardiner, Maine. She was the daughter of 10. Daniel Thaddeus Leavitte and 11. Louisa Hasson.

Children of Cavalier Chapman and Nellie Leavitte are:

i. Elmer H Chapman, born May 20, 1894 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Jan 23, 1916.

Notes for Elmer H Chapman:

Died at age 22 of pneumonia. He was never married. He worked up untill his death in a lumber mill.

He's buried in the same lot as his grandparents although they have no stones to mark them.

Forrest his brother, told of how the family was very poor and that Elmer went to work and bought a new pair of shoes for Forrest. Untill his death Forrest took care of Elmer's grave by having a stone placed and taking flowers out to him.

More About Elmer H Chapman:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary, Dresden, Maine

ii. Emery Leroy Chapman, born Jan 11, 1899 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Aug 01, 1969; married Gussie Louise Clancey Jun 13, 1939; born Aug 14, 1915 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine.

More About Emery Leroy Chapman:

Burial: Forest Hill Cemetary in same lot as his parents

Occupation: Was a farmer and owned his own farm for a time.

iii. Marion Florence Chapman, born Aug 04, 1901 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Dec 14, 1988; married Thomas L O'Donnell 1921; born Feb 1900 in Somerville, Massachusetts; died 1959.

2 iv. LaForrest Lincoln Chapman, born Apr 06, 1904 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Aug 04, 1977 in Rockland, Knox County, Maine; married Geneva Margaret Leigher May 05, 1929.

v. Clifton Earl Chapman, born Mar 25, 1907 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Jul 07, 1975 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; met Pearl Verna Parris Sep 15, 1935; born Nov 10, 1915 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine.

vi. Mary Elizabeth Chapman, born Oct 05, 1914 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; married Clarence H Haus in Boston, Massachusetts; born Aug 10, 1910 in Cherryville, Mo.

 

6. William L Leigher, born Oct 31, 1856 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 11, 1935 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 12. Franklin Leigher and 13. Clarissa A Vinal. He married 7. Isa Alberta Jones Jul 04, 1905.

7. Isa Alberta Jones, born Jan 27, 1870 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Jan 04, 1938 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. She was the daughter of 14. Simon Jones and 15. Lydia Hibbert.

More About William L Leigher:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Knox County, Maine

Occupation: Millman

Child of William Leigher and Isa Jones is:

3 i. Geneva Margaret Leigher, born Jun 24, 1911 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Oct 06, 1970 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married LaForrest Lincoln Chapman May 05, 1929.

 

Generation No. 4

8. Zebediah Chapman, born 1812 in Dresden, Maine; died Sep 12, 1894. He was the son of 16. Thomas Chapman and 17. Hannah Hatch. He married 9. Sarah Elizabeth Blair May 25, 1839.

9. Sarah Elizabeth Blair, born May 14, 1820; died Mar 13, 1904. She was the daughter of 18. Thomas Marson Blair and 19. Polly Pung.

More About Zebediah Chapman:

Census: 1840, Lincoln County, Maine

Residence: 1870, Dresden, Lincoln, Maine

Children of Zebediah Chapman and Sarah Blair are:

i. David G Chapman, born Aug 08, 1839 in Dresden, Maine; died Apr 11, 1869 in Dresden, Maine; married Mary L Parris May 04, 1866; born Dec 20, 1844 in Dresden, Maine; died 1903.

ii. Margaret Jane Chapman, born Oct 02, 1841 in Dresden, Maine; married George H Parris Jan 04, 1869; born 1845 in Chelsea, Maine; died 1915.

iii. Ezekiel Robert Chapman, born May 22, 1845 in Dresden, Maine; died Feb 24, 1911 in South Dresden, Maine; married Emma A Fowles; born Mar 02, 1851 in Westport, Maine; died Dec 27, 1928.

More About Ezekiel Robert Chapman:

Military service: 1863, Enliste in Company A 15th Maine, transferred March 4, 1865 to Company B first battalion, discharged at Port Royal October 29, 1865

Occupation: Mail Carrier between West Dresden and South Dresden.

iv. Addie V Chapman, born 1848 in Dresden, Maine; died Jul 12, 1868 in Pittston, Maine.

v. Merrill Chapman, born Sep 18, 1850 in Dresden, Maine.

4 vi. Cavalier Houdlette Chapman, born Nov 18, 1857; died May 25, 1941; married Nellie Ann Leavitte Nov 12, 1893.

vii. Carrie Jean Chapman, died Mar 03, 1880; married Daniel Sullivan.

viii. Edward Cavalier Chapman, born Mar 22, 1847 in Dresden, Maine; died Abt. 1930 in Lee, New Hampshire; married (1) Martha E.; born 1855; died 1917; married (2) Mary Ann Groves 1873; born Sep 11, 1842 in Wiscasset, Maine; died Aug 10, 1884.

More About Mary Ann Groves:

Cause of Death: died during child birth

 

10. Daniel Thaddeus Leavitte, born May 24, 1854 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Oct 19, 1936 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine. He was the son of 20. John Leavitte and 21. Mary J Stilphen. He married 11. Louisa Hasson.

11. Louisa Hasson, born Dec 22, 1854 in Bath, Maine; died Mar 09, 1914 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine. She was the daughter of 22. William Hasson and 23. Sarah Rines.

Child of Daniel Leavitte and Louisa Hasson is:

5 i. Nellie Ann Leavitte, born Jan 23, 1877; died May 25, 1956 in Gardiner, Maine; married Cavalier Houdlette Chapman Nov 12, 1893.

 

12. Franklin Leigher, born Dec 25, 1826 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 04, 1916 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 24. Peter Leigher and 25. Mary Polly Overlock. He married 13. Clarissa A Vinal Jul 26, 1851.

13. Clarissa A Vinal, born Apr 08, 1830 in Nobleboro, Maine; died Feb 26, 1916 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. She was the daughter of 26. John P Vinal and 27. Hannah Hilton.

More About Franklin Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

More About Clarissa A Vinal:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

Residence: 1910, Washington, Knox, Maine

Children of Franklin Leigher and Clarissa Vinal are:

i. Infant Leigher, died Dec 22, 1851.

More About Infant Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

ii. Mary Emma Leigher, born Feb 06, 1853 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Jan 24, 1902; married Charles Evans; born Jul 27, 1855; died Dec 27, 1927 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

More About Mary Emma Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

More About Charles Evans:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

iii. Willie A Leigher, born Apr 1855 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Aug 17, 1857.

More About Willie A Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

6 iv. William L Leigher, born Oct 31, 1856 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 11, 1935 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married (1) Sarah Greenleaf Oct 13, 1879; married (2) Isa Alberta Jones Jul 04, 1905.

v. Nelly Leigher, born 1862; married Wtman Tibbets; born 1854; died 1917.

vi. Ada Leigher, born 1864; married ? Vinal.

vii. Affie V Leigher, born Mar 02, 1866 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 07, 1964 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Charles Evans; born Jul 27, 1855; died Dec 27, 1927 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

More About Affie V Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

More About Charles Evans:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

viii. Harriet M Leigher, born Dec 19, 1870 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Feb 25, 1887.

More About Harriet M Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary, Washington, Maine

ix. Edward A Leigher, born Nov 19, 1872 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Oct 09, 1953 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Inez Sukeforth Mar 11, 1900; born Feb 11, 1880; died Oct 04, 1948 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

More About Edward A Leigher:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Knox County, Maine

More About Inez Sukeforth:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Knox County, Maine

x. Annie Velaro Leigher, born 1876 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died 1963; married Arthur Overlock 1898; born 1878.

 

14. Simon Jones, born Jan 01, 1831 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 29, 1903 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 28. Simon Jones and 29. Jane Laughton. He married 15. Lydia Hibbert Nov 22, 1851.

15. Lydia Hibbert, born Jun 19, 1831 in Palermo, Maine; died Nov 28, 1896 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. She was the daughter of 30. Thomas Hibbert and 31. Marinda Trask Vittum.

More About Simon Jones:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

Occupation: 1850, Census lists as Cooper

Residence: 1880, Washington, Knox, Maine, United States

Children of Simon Jones and Lydia Hibbert are:

i. Nancy Jones, born 1852; died 1886; married Joseph Turner.

More About Nancy Jones:

Burial: Mountain Cemetary, Washington, Maine

More About Joseph Turner:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

ii. Lydia M Jones, born 1855; died Jan 12, 1932; married Otis Day May 05, 1878 in Washington, Maine; born 1849; died Dec 10, 1902.

More About Lydia M Jones:

Burial: McDowell Cemetary, RT 220 in Washington aine

More About Otis Day:

Burial: McDowell Cemetary, RT 220 in Washington aine

iii. Ada L Jones, born Oct 1858; died Sep 14, 1924; married Daniel Jones; born Feb 1856; died Apr 30, 1904.

More About Ada L Jones:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

More About Daniel Jones:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

iv. Joseph Henry Jones, born 1860; died Nov 07, 1918; married Emma.

More About Joseph Henry Jones:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

v. William M Jones, born 1867; died 1934; married Lenore.

7 vi. Isa Alberta Jones, born Jan 27, 1870 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Jan 04, 1938 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married William L Leigher Jul 04, 1905.

vii. Linwood Perley Jones, born Jan 16, 1874; died Feb 05, 1948; married Lotta Iola Farrar; born May 31, 1876; died Apr 18, 1960.

More About Linwood Perley Jones:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

Occupation: Maine Guide and Blacksmith

More About Lotta Iola Farrar:

Burial: Marr Cemetary, Washington, Maine

 

Generation No. 5

16. Thomas Chapman, born Aug 06, 1777 in Mercer, Maine. He married 17. Hannah Hatch Dec 29, 1807.

17. Hannah Hatch, born May 22, 1774 in Dresden, Maine; died in Dresden, Maine.

Child of Thomas Chapman and Hannah Hatch is:

8 i. Zebediah Chapman, born 1812 in Dresden, Maine; died Sep 12, 1894; married Sarah Elizabeth Blair May 25, 1839.

 

18. Thomas Marson Blair, born 1768 in Worchester, Massachusetts. He was the son of 36. Lieutenant James Blair and 37. Jane Todd. He married 19. Polly Pung May 11, 1807 in Dresden, Maine.

19. Polly Pung, born Dec 25, 1791 in At sea. She was the daughter of 38. Capt. Capt. Thomas Pung and 39. Eleanor Cobb.

More About Thomas Marson Blair:

Occupation: Ship Builder

Children of Thomas Blair and Polly Pung are:

i. Thomas Marson Jr Blair, born May 29, 1806 in Dresden, Maine; died Dec 21, 1855; married Susanne Moores May 24, 1831; born Jul 23, 1810 in Gardiner, Maine; died Mar 18, 1882.

More About Thomas Marson Jr Blair:

Burial: Methodist Cemetary, South Dresden, Maine

More About Susanne Moores:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary, Dresden, Maine

ii. James Blair, born Apr 29, 1811 in Dresden, Maine.

iii. Margerat Jane Blair, born Jul 12, 1812; died May 03, 1886 in Maple Grove Cemetary, Dresden, Maine; married Peter Johnson 1843 in Boston, Massachusetts; born Oct 06, 1812 in Faaborg, Denmark.

More About Peter Johnson:

Burial: Pine Grove Cemetary

Occupation: Mariner

iv. William Todd Blair, born Jul 17, 1815 in Dresden, Maine; married Helen L Chapman 1840.

9 v. Sarah Elizabeth Blair, born May 14, 1820; died Mar 13, 1904; married Zebediah Chapman May 25, 1839.

vi. Frank Blair, born Apr 10, 1823 in Dresden, Maine.

vii. Edward Cavalier Blair, born Aug 01, 1826 in Dresden, Maine; died Feb 15, 1912; married Sarah L. Hilton Apr 11, 1850 in Declared marriage intention; born Mar 20, 1828; died May 07, 1910.

More About Edward Cavalier Blair:

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetary, Wiscasset, Maine

Occupation: Farmer

More About Sarah L. Hilton:

Burial: Greenlawn Cemetary, Wiscasset, Maine

 

20. John Leavitte He married 21. Mary J Stilphen.

21. Mary J Stilphen, born 1831; died Oct 29, 1859. She was the daughter of 43. Nancy Stilphen.

Child of John Leavitte and Mary Stilphen is:

10 i. Daniel Thaddeus Leavitte, born May 24, 1854 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; died Oct 19, 1936 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; married Louisa Hasson.

 

22. William Hasson, born 1829; died Feb 19, 1906 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine. He was the son of 44. Moses Hasson and 45. Anna Rines or Rivers. He married 23. Sarah Rines.

23. Sarah Rines, born 1832 in Wiscassett, Maine; died Jan 17, 1884 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine. She was the daughter of 46. James Rines and 47. Margaret.

Children of William Hasson and Sarah Rines are:

11 i. Louisa Hasson, born Dec 22, 1854 in Bath, Maine; died Mar 09, 1914 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; married Daniel Thaddeus Leavitte.

ii. Eva Hasson

iii. Bert Hasson

 

24. Peter Leigher, born 1802; died 1850 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 48. Peter Henry Lehr and 49. Katherine Brodtmann. He married 25. Mary Polly Overlock May 08, 1825 in Washington, Maine.

25. Mary Polly Overlock, born 1803 in Waldoboro, Maine. She was the daughter of 50. Johann Jost Oberlach and 51. Christina Elstein.

Notes for Peter Leigher:

Peter was age 48 when he drowned at the So Liberty mill dam.[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 16, Ed. 1, Tree #0499, Date of Import: 1 Aug 1999]

 

More About Peter Leigher:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary

Children of Peter Leigher and Mary Overlock are:

12 i. Franklin Leigher, born Dec 25, 1826 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 04, 1916 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Clarissa A Vinal Jul 26, 1851.

ii. Rufus Leigher, born Abt. 1831 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 06, 1904 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Margaret Emma; born 1850; died 1926.

More About Rufus Leigher:

Burial: Pierpiont Cemetery, Washington, Maine

More About Margaret Emma:

Burial: Pierpiont Cemetery, Washington, Maine

iii. Catherine Leigher, born Mar 24, 1836 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Apr 08, 1921 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Simon Overlock Apr 02, 1855; born Aug 25, 1836 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Oct 04, 1909 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

More About Catherine Leigher:

Burial: Pierpoint Cemetary

 

26. John P Vinal, born Dec 02, 1778 in Waldoboro, Maine; died May 28, 1864. He married 27. Hannah Hilton.

27. Hannah Hilton, born 1790.

More About John P Vinal:

Burial: Nash Cemetary, Nobleboro, Maine

Occupation: Joiner

Children of John Vinal and Hannah Hilton are:

i. Mary B Vinal, born 1806 in Nobleboro, Maine; died 1885 in Nobleboro, Maine; married Joseph Benner Apr 14, 1827 in Waldoboro, Maine.

ii. Elizabeth Vinal, born May 07, 1811; died Aug 01, 1899 in Nobleboro, Maine; married Church Nash Jun 27, 1830 in Nobleboro, Maine.

iii. George W Vinal, born Abt. 1812; married Mary Eugley 1834 in Nobleboro, Maine.

iv. Sophronia Vinal, born Abt. 1816; married James Nash 1836 in Nobleboro, Maine.

v. Leonard Vinal, born Mar 06, 1819; died Aug 26, 1893 in Jefferson, Maine; married Clarissa Ann Moody 1843; born 1825; died 1898 in Jefferson, Maine.

vi. John Vinal, born Abt. 1820; married Margaret Noyes in Jefferson, Maine.

13 vii. Clarissa A Vinal, born Apr 08, 1830 in Nobleboro, Maine; died Feb 26, 1916 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Franklin Leigher Jul 26, 1851.

 

28. Simon Jones, born 1798 in Woolwich or Walpole Maine; died in Washington, Maine. He married 29. Jane Laughton Nov 04, 1826 in Bristol, Maine.

29. Jane Laughton, born Jan 22, 1798 in Bristol, Maine. She was the daughter of 58. James Laughton and 59. Lydia Cushing Howland.

Children of Simon Jones and Jane Laughton are:

i. Nancy Jones, born Abt. 1828.

14 ii. Simon Jones, born Jan 01, 1831 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; died Mar 29, 1903 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Lydia Hibbert Nov 22, 1851.

iii. James Jones, born Abt. 1834.

More About James Jones:

Occupation: 1850, Cooper

iv. Cushman Jones, born Abt. 1837; died Bef. 1880; married Viola C Turner.

More About Cushman Jones:

Occupation: 1870, Grocer

 

30. Thomas Hibbert, born May 21, 1809 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine; died in Hallowell, Maine. He was the son of 60. Daniel Hibbert and 61. Judith Morrill. He married 31. Marinda Trask Vittum Oct 20, 1830.

31. Marinda Trask Vittum, born in Newcastle, Maine. She was the daughter of 62. unknown.

More About Thomas Hibbert:

Burial: Hallowell, Maine

Children of Thomas Hibbert and Marinda Vittum are:

15 i. Lydia Hibbert, born Jun 19, 1831 in Palermo, Maine; died Nov 28, 1896 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Simon Jones Nov 22, 1851.

ii. William H Hibbert, born 1837.

More About William H Hibbert:

Comment 1: Lost at sea

iii. Stillman Hibbert

iv. Stowe Hibbert

v. Thomas Joseph Hibbert, born 1841.

vi. Henry Hibbert, born 1839; married Elizabeth Luce Abt. 1862; born in Union, Maine.

vii. Irene Hibbert, married Leander A Bowler Mar 22, 1870 in Washington, Maine Intentions; born in Palermo, Maine.

viii. Jennie Hibbert, married ?? Burbank.

ix. Eyilda Hibbert, married ?? Titus.

x. Nelson Hibbert, married Lucinda Howes Mar 03, 1877 in Washington, Maine.

xi. Marenda Hibbert, married Charles Light Dec 25, 1864 in Washington, Maine Intentions; died Abt. 1866 in Lights Cemetery, Hibbert Road, Washington, Maine.

Generation No. 6

36. Lieutenant James Blair, born 1702; died Dec 24, 1804. He was the son of 72. Robert Col. Blair and 73. Isabella Rankin. He married 37. Jane Todd.

37. Jane Todd

Notes for Lieutenant James Blair:

 

James Blair is reported by tradition to have arrived in Sagadahoc Co., Maine from England in the year 1738 with his wife JANE TODD, they being only recently married. Their eldest son Robert was reported to have been born at sea during the voyage to the colonies. James and Jane settled in Wiscasset, Me., in the area northeast of the Sagadahoc River which subsequently incorporated to become the towns of Woolwich, Arrowsic, and Georgetown, Me. I was once told that their graves are located in what is now the town of Arrowsic, but have never located them. There is no information yet to indicate where their dwelling or dwellings may have been located.

The U.S. Census of 1790 records James Blair and James Blair Jr, residence Woolwich, Lincoln Co., Me.. In the household of James Sr., in addition to himself, were two males over the age of 16, one male under the age of 16, and five females.

In the Vital records of Georgetown, Me. James Blair is recorded as having died at the age of 102 years, no date of death given. His wife Jane Blair is recorded to have died in 1823 at the age of 104 years. This would place her birth at around the year 1719, and would have made her about 19 years old in 1738, the year tradition places their arrival in this country. Robert, their firstborn, is reported to have died in the year 1838 at the age of 100.

I have never located any document which offers proof that they did, in fact, arrive in the Wiscasset, Maine area at the time that tradition maintains. In addition there is an oddity in the birthdates of their children, and in the advanced ages claimed for James, Jane, and their son Robert, at the times of their deaths. As far as the records permit is seems that their next child after Robert was James Jr., who was born about the year 1753. This would indicate up to a 16 year break in child bearing in a woman who eventually had 11 children. Their ninth child, Sarah is known to have been born in 1772. If Jane actually was born about 1719 this would have made her about 53 years old when Sarah was born, with Margaret and Alexander still to come.

 

 

 

 

More About Lieutenant James Blair:

Fact 1 (2): 1776, Alarm man for Rutland, Mass

Occupation: Mill Wright

Property: Dec 26, 1746, 90 acres in Rutland, Massachusetts lying on Turkey Hill Pond

Notes for Jane Todd:

 

immigrated from England. Reportedly had eleven children, but only two confirmed

 

Children of James Blair and Jane Todd are:

18 i. Thomas Marson Blair, born 1768 in Worchester, Massachusetts; married Polly Pung May 11, 1807 in Dresden, Maine.

ii. William Blair

 

38. Capt. Capt. Thomas Pung He married 39. Eleanor Cobb.

39. Eleanor Cobb, born Sep 05, 1750 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass. She was the daughter of 78. Ebenezer Cobb and 79. Jerusha Cushman.

Child of Capt. Pung and Eleanor Cobb is:

19 i. Polly Pung, born Dec 25, 1791 in At sea; married Thomas Marson Blair May 11, 1807 in Dresden, Maine.

 

43. Nancy Stilphen She was the daughter of 86. George Stilphen and 87. Mary Rittal.

Child of Nancy Stilphen is:

21 i. Mary J Stilphen, born 1831; died Oct 29, 1859; married John Leavitte.

 

44. Moses Hasson, born 1781; died Nov 22, 1851 in Alna, Maine. He married 45. Anna Rines or Rivers.

45. Anna Rines or Rivers

Child of Moses Hasson and Anna Rivers is:

22 i. William Hasson, born 1829; died Feb 19, 1906 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; married Sarah Rines.

 

46. James Rines, born Abt. 1809. He married 47. Margaret.

47. Margaret, born Abt. 1811; died Jan 21, 1894.

Children of James Rines and Margaret are:

i. Martha J Rines

ii. Malvina Rines

iii. Seth Rines

iv. Mary R. Rines

v. Emily E Rines

vi. Elisa Rines

vii. Ellen Rines

23 viii. Sarah Rines, born 1832 in Wiscassett, Maine; died Jan 17, 1884 in Dresden, Lincoln County, Maine; married William Hasson.

 

48. Peter Henry Lehr, born 1758 in Waldoboro, Maine; died Nov 03, 1822 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 96. Johann Henry Lehr and 97. Elisabetha Barbara Seitz. He married 49. Katherine Brodtmann Feb 1779 in Waldoboro, Maine.

49. Katherine Brodtmann, born Abt. 1753. She was the daughter of 98. Micheal Brodtmann and 99. Unknown.

Notes for Peter Henry Lehr:

Peter Lehr or Leaher of Lincoln County Maine was a private in Col. Voses's Regiment of the Massachusetts line for 3 years and served at Valley Forge. He was enrolled as a pensioner in 1818 and died in 1822. His personal estate in 1820 consisted of "2 cows, 2 hogs, and a little old furniture."

More About Peter Henry Lehr:

Civil: Lincoln Co.

Military service: Revolutionary War Soldier

Children of Peter Lehr and Katherine Brodtmann are:

i. Martin Leigher, born 1779 in Waldoboro, Maine; married Polly Overlock.

ii. Elizabeth Lehr, born May 09, 1781 in Waldoboro, Maine; died Jun 22, 1869 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Samuel Stickney Dec 31, 1807 in Waldoboro, Maine; born May 16, 1777 in New Hampshire; died Dec 18, 1861 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

More About Elizabeth Lehr:

Burial: Davis & Daggett

More About Samuel Stickney:

Burial: Davis & Daggett

iii. Katherine Leigher, born Abt. 1786; married Daniel Butters May 04, 1815; born in Union, Maine.

iv. Capt. Henry Lehr, born Abt. 1787; died Apr 17, 1839; married Mary Bowes Feb 07, 1815; born 1786 in Putnam, Maine; died Sep 22, 1848.

More About Capt. Henry Lehr:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary

More About Mary Bowes:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary

v. Mary Leigher, born 1788.

vi. Matthias Leigher, born Abt. 1793.

vii. Fredrick Leigher, born Abt. 1795.

viii. John Lehr, born 1800; married Catherine Bornheimer Aug 25, 1823 in Washington, Maine.

ix. Susan Lehr, born Jan 1800; died Feb 04, 1872; married Wilbert Daggett Feb 25, 1830; died May 11, 1892.

More About Susan Lehr:

Burial: Davis-Daggett Cemetery, Route 220(North Waldoboro Road) Washington, Knox County, Maine

More About Wilbert Daggett:

Burial: Davis-Daggett Cemetery, Route 220(North Waldoboro Road) Washington, Knox County, Maine

24 x. Peter Leigher, born 1802; died 1850 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married (1) Mary Polly Overlock May 08, 1825 in Washington, Maine; married (2) Mary Oberlach May 08, 1825.

xi. Margaret Leigher, born 1803; died 1873; married Anthony DeCoster; born 1806; died 1870.

More About Margaret Leigher:

Burial: Davis-Daggett Cemetery, Route 220(North Waldoboro Road) Washington, Knox County, Maine

More About Anthony DeCoster:

Burial: Davis-Daggett Cemetery, Route 220(North Waldoboro Road) Washington, Knox County, Maine

xii. Nancy Leigher, born Jul 11, 1806 in Waldoboro, Maine; died Feb 23, 1896 in Ashland, Aroostook Co., ME; married Rufus Gilmore Kalloch Nov 14, 1830; born Apr 27, 1800 in Warren, Knox Co., ME; died in Ashland, Aroostook Co., ME.

 

50. Johann Jost Oberlach, born Oct 26, 1748 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany; died Aft. 1830 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. He was the son of 100. Johann Gottfriedt Oberlach and 101. Maria Cassandra Benner. He married 51. Christina Elstein Dec 26, 1787 in Waldoboro, Maine.

51. Christina Elstein, born Abt. 1758 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine; died Aft. 1830 in Washington, Knox County, Maine. She was the daughter of 102. Andreas Elstein and 103. Veronica.

Children of Johann Oberlach and Christina Elstein are:

25 i. Mary Polly Overlock, born 1803 in Waldoboro, Maine; married Peter Leigher May 08, 1825 in Washington, Maine.

ii. Margaret Oberlach, died Unknown; married Ebenezer Day Abt. 1808; died Unknown.

iii. John B. Overlock, born Abt. 1770 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown; married Mary Margaret Elstein Abt. 1791 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown.

iv. Jane Overlock, born Abt. 1779 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown; married Andrew Ulmer; died Unknown.

v. Jacob Oberlach Overlock, born Bet. 1784 - 1788 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Abt. 1850; married Eunice Goodspeed Dec 09, 1813; born Abt. 1795 in Penobscot Co., ME; died Aft. Jun 16, 1880.

vi. Martin Oberlach, born Jan 29, 1789 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Jul 29, 1888 in South Liberty, Waldo Co., ME; married Mehitable Goodspeed Feb 10, 1819 in Putnam, Washington Co., ME; born Aug 07, 1801 in China, Kennebec Co., ME; died May 12, 1866 in South Liberty, Waldo Co., ME.

vii. Joseph Oberlach, born 1790 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Dec 07, 1880 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; married Sarah Nelson Mar 24, 1824 in Washington Co., ME; died Unknown.

viii. Michael Oberlach, born Mar 15, 1797 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Mar 03, 1883; married Sophronia Bagley Nov 23, 1821; died Unknown.

ix. Sally Oberlach, born 1800; died Unknown; married Charles Esancyisense 1822; died Unknown.

x. Mary Oberlach, born 1803; died Unknown; married Peter Leigher May 08, 1825; born 1802; died 1850 in Washington, Knox County, Maine.

Notes for Peter Leigher:

Peter was age 48 when he drowned at the So Liberty mill dam.[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 16, Ed. 1, Tree #0499, Date of Import: 1 Aug 1999]

 

More About Peter Leigher:

Burial: Maple Grove Cemetary

 

58. James Laughton, born Nov 21, 1741 in Concord, Massachusetts; died Jun 20, 1833. He was the son of 116. John Laughton and 117. Esther Davis. He married 59. Lydia Cushing Howland Dec 30, 1780.

59. Lydia Cushing Howland, born Apr 25, 1762 in Pembroke, Mass; died Aug 06, 1837 in Bristol, Maine. She was the daughter of 118. Zebulon Howland and 119. Lydia Cushing.

Notes for James Laughton:

 

Laughton, James:

Additional military information: Sergeant, Capt. Thomas Brackett's co., Col

James Cargill's regt.; from May 1775 for 6 months; also, Sergeant, Capt Thomas

Brackett's co., Col. Joseph North's Lincoln Co. regt.; from 1 Jan 1777 for 3

months; served in Rhode Island; also, Sergeant, Capt. Benjamin Plummer's co.,

Col. Samuel McCobb's Lincoln Co. regt.; from May to 18 (or 19) Nov 1779; served

at Camden and Bagaduce; also, Sergeant, Capt. Thomas Brackett's co., Col.

Mason Wheeton's Lincoln Co. regt.; from Jun 1780 for one month; detached with

17 men to do guard duty on the West side of Penobscot Bay ME.

 

 

More About James Laughton:

Burial: Hatch Cemetary

More About Lydia Cushing Howland:

Burial: Hatch Cemetary

Children of James Laughton and Lydia Howland are:

i. Hannah Laughton, born Jan 23, 1782 in Bristol, Maine; died Jul 02, 1865; married Mark Hatch; born in Bristol, Maine.

ii. Lydid Laughton, born Dec 09, 1783.

iii. James Laughton, born May 17, 1785; died May 04, 1872 in Harmony, Maine; married Sarah Wellman.

iv. Elizabeth Laughton, born May 03, 1787; married Thomas Partrick; born in Putnam(Washington), Maine.

v. Capt. John Laughton, born Dec 22, 1789 in Bristol, Maine; married Margaret Hatch Jan 05, 1828; born in Bristol, Maine.

vi. Samuel Laughton, born Mar 10, 1791 in Bristol, Maine; married Mary E. McGurire; born in Bristol, Maine.

vii. Sarah Laughton, born Oct 17, 1792 in Bristol, Maine; married Ezeckiel Farrow; born in Putnam(Washington), Maine.

viii. Thomas Laughton, born Dec 22, 1794; married Lydia Yeates.

ix. Isaac Laughton, born Oct 03, 1796.

29 x. Jane Laughton, born Jan 22, 1798 in Bristol, Maine; married Simon Jones Nov 04, 1826 in Bristol, Maine.

xi. Nancy Laughton, born Nov 08, 1800; married William Hatch; born Abt. 1782.

 

60. Daniel Hibbert, born 1782 in Cornish, Maine; died Dec 08, 1850 in Somerville, Maine. He was the son of 120. Joseph Hibbert and 121. Dorothy Eastman. He married 61. Judith Morrill 1802.

61. Judith Morrill, born Abt. 1775; died Nov 16, 1842. She was the daughter of 122. Thomas Morrill and 123. Abigail Johnson.

Children of Daniel Hibbert and Judith Morrill are:

i. Ruth Hibbert, born Feb 23, 1803 in Cornish, York, Maine.

ii. Abigail Hibbert, born May 04, 1804 in Cornish, York, Maine.

30 iii. Thomas Hibbert, born May 21, 1809 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine; died in Hallowell, Maine; married Marinda Trask Vittum Oct 20, 1830.

iv. Nancy Hibbert, born Jun 30, 1810 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine; married John Gray.

v. Temperance Hibbert, born Jun 10, 1812 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine; married David Glidden 1832 in Somerville, Lincoln, Maine, USA; born Sep 23, 1807 in Somerville, Lincoln, Maine, USA; died Jun 12, 1863.

vi. Oliver Hibbert, born Apr 25, 1815 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine.

vii. Daniel Morrill Hibbert, born Nov 01, 1820 in Hibbert's Gore, Maine; died Aug 23, 1863 in Hilton Head, South Carolina; married (1) Hannah Rollins Nov 05, 1846 in Washington, Maine Intentions; born Aug 27, 1824; died Jan 24, 1856; married (2) Ann Maria Rollins Dec 09, 1858 in Washington, Maine; born Jun 20, 1830; died May 20, 1892.

More About Daniel Morrill Hibbert:

Burial: Beaufort National Cemetery, Beaufort, Beaufort County, South Carolina PLOT 1678

Mil Serv: PVT H 8 MS INF

More About Hannah Rollins:

Burial: Rollins Cemetery, Razorville, Maine

 

62. unknown, born in New Hampshire.

Child of unknown is:

31 i. Marinda Trask Vittum, born in Newcastle, Maine; married Thomas Hibbert Oct 20, 1830.

 

Generation No. 7

72. Robert Col. Blair, born 1683 in Aghadowey, Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland; died Oct 14, 1774 in Worcester, Massachuesetts. He was the son of 144. Col. James Blair and 145. Racheal Boyd. He married 73. Isabella Rankin in Aghodowey.

73. Isabella Rankin, born 1683 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ireland; died Feb 10, 1765 in Worchester, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 146. David Rankin.

Notes for Robert Col. Blair:

 

A large, splendid, and expensive monument was erected about the year 1825 in the city of Londonderrry, in the North of Ireland, to the memory of the brave men and apprentice boys who defended that city so manfully during the siege, in the years 1688 and 1689. On this monument is engraved the name of Colonel Robert Blair, with a large number of others of the most brave. This Robert Blair belonged to the family of Blairs of Blairathol, in Scotland. His son, of the same name, Colonel Robert Blair, came to North America with his regiment, and brought with him his wife and family, and afterwards settled in Worcester, Mass., where they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. Blair died there in the year 1774, aged 82 years, and his wife, Isabella, died in the year 1765, aged 82 years. Robert and Isabella emigrated with his parents from Londonderry, Ireland, aboard The Robert arriving 4 August 1718 in Boston, Massachusetts.

 

[

 

 

More About Robert Col. Blair:

Burial: Oct 1774, Common Cemetery, Worcester, Massachusetts

Emigration: with parents from Londonderry Ireland aboard the Robert arriving August 4 1718 in Boston, Mass.

Military service: Robert was at the seige of Londonderry in Scotland in 1688

Notes for Isabella Rankin:

Isabella Blair obituary (from The Pennsylvania Gazette, 2 May 1765,

Item #35720, Accessible Archives Search and Infonnation Server,

Internet)

BOSTON, April l5. We hear from Worcester, that lately died there Mrs.

Isahella Blair, aged 82Years, formerly a noted Midwife in that Place. She

hath left a Husband aged 81; eleven children; ninety-three Grand

Children; in all one hundred and twenty-six. She lived with her Hushand

sixty-two Years, and during that time her own Death was the only one

that happened in the Family. She was decently interred in the new Mode.

[This is Isabella Rankin, wife of Robert Blair of Worcester,

Massachusetts, progenitors of Blair families who spread throughout the

country.] Isabella (Rankin) Blair, died 10 Feb 1765. She was 82 years old. She is

buried nearby but not adjacent to her husband in Worcester Common. The

children of Robert and Isabella (Rankin) Blair were: 1- Matthew. born

about 1704 2- Ensign David, born between 1708/9 3- John, born 1710 4-

Sarah, born about 171511716 5- Dorothy (Dolly), born cal717 6-

William, born 1718 7- James, born 1719 8- Robert, born 20 JUN 1720

9- Elizabeth, born 1724, 10-Mary, born 1 APR 1725

11-Joseph, born in 1727

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

More About Isabella Rankin:

Burial: Common Cemetery, Worcester, Massachusetts

Occupation: Midwife

Children of Robert Blair and Isabella Rankin are:

36 i. Lieutenant James Blair, born 1702; died Dec 24, 1804; married Jane Todd.

ii. Matthew Blair, born Bet. 1704 - 1705.

iii. Joesph Blair, born 1727 in Worcester, Massachusetts; died Feb 08, 1804 in Amhersr, Massachusetts; married Mary.

 

78. Ebenezer Cobb He was the son of 156. Ebenezer Cobb and 157. Ruth Tinkham. He married 79. Jerusha Cushman Oct 30, 1747.

79. Jerusha Cushman, born Jan 15, 1726/27 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 158. Robert Cushman and 159. Mary Mercy Washburn.

Children of Ebenezer Cobb and Jerusha Cushman are:

39 i. Eleanor Cobb, born Sep 05, 1750 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass; married Capt. Capt. Thomas Pung.

ii. Mercy Cobb

More About Mercy Cobb:

Residence: Massachusetts

 

86. George Stilphen He was the son of 172. Micheal Stilphen and 173. Suzanna ?. He married 87. Mary Rittal Jan 12, 1773.

87. Mary Rittal, born Jun 17, 1757. She was the daughter of 174. Francis Rittal and 175. Lucy Houdelette.

More About Mary Rittal:

Census: 1850, Dresden, Maine. Listed as age 93 living with Nancy and Mary Jane Stilphen.

Children of George Stilphen and Mary Rittal are:

43 i. Nancy Stilphen.

ii. Cornelius Stilphen

 

96. Johann Henry Lehr He married 97. Elisabetha Barbara Seitz.

97. Elisabetha Barbara Seitz, born Dec 30, 1734 in Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany. She was the daughter of 194. Laurentius Seitz and 195. Anna Margaretha Actnuderer.

Notes for Elisabetha Barbara Seitz:

From the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher, was probably the wife of Johann Henrich Lehr.

Child of Johann Lehr and Elisabetha Seitz is:

48 i. Peter Henry Lehr, born 1758 in Waldoboro, Maine; died Nov 03, 1822 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Katherine Brodtmann Feb 1779 in Waldoboro, Maine.

 

98. Micheal Brodtmann He married 99. Unknown.

99. Unknown

More About Micheal Brodtmann:

Immigration: Oct 09, 1753, on ship Elizabeth to Broad Bay, Maine

Children of Micheal Brodtmann and Unknown are:

49 i. Katherine Brodtmann, born Abt. 1753; married Peter Henry Lehr Feb 1779 in Waldoboro, Maine.

ii. Charles Brodtmann, born Abt. 1755 in BroadBay Plantation, Maine (now Waldoboro); married Elizabeth Catherine Seitlinger.

iii. Martin Brodtmann, born Abt. 1757; died Bef. 1790.

Notes for Martin Brodtmann:

As Martin Bowman he served as a private in Captain Phillip M Ulster's Company, Col Mc Cobb's Regiment in the Revolutionary War, enlisted July 8, 1779, discharged September 24, 1779, served 2 months, 16 days on the expedition to Penobscot in 1779.

 

100. Johann Gottfriedt Oberlach, born May 28, 1717 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany; died Bef. 1790 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine. He was the son of 200. Johann Conrad Ueberlach and 201. Anna Catherine Benner. He married 101. Maria Cassandra Benner Nov 24, 1743 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

101. Maria Cassandra Benner, born Feb 19, 1724/25 in Eibach, Dillenburg, Hessen-Nassau, Germany/Dillenburg, Germany; died Aft. Jun 20, 1765 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine. She was the daughter of 202. George Ludwig Benner and 203. Elizabetha.

Children of Johann Oberlach and Maria Benner are:

50 i. Johann Jost Oberlach, born Oct 26, 1748 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany; died Aft. 1830 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Christina Elstein Dec 26, 1787 in Waldoboro, Maine.

ii. Johann Ludwig Oberlach, born Nov 20, 1744 in Herborn, Hesson-Nassau, Germany; died Bef. 1752 in Germany.

iii. Anna Margaretha Oberlach, born Oct 24, 1745 in Herborn, Hesson-Nassau, Germany; died Unknown.

iv. Anna Elisabeth Oberlach, born Sep 24, 1750 in Herborn, Hesson-Nassau, Germany; died 1752 in Germany.

v. John Oberlach, born Feb 20, 1756 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown.

vi. John Henry Oberlach, born Sep 04, 1759 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown.

vii. J. Charles Oberlach, born Apr 07, 1762 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died 1838 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME.

viii. John Frank Oberlach, born Jun 20, 1765 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown; married Elizabeth Winkkenpaw Dec 1786 in Waldoboro, Lincoln Co., ME; died Unknown.

 

102. Andreas Elstein He married 103. Veronica.

103. Veronica

Child of Andreas Elstein and Veronica is:

51 i. Christina Elstein, born Abt. 1758 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine; died Aft. 1830 in Washington, Knox County, Maine; married Johann Jost Oberlach Dec 26, 1787 in Waldoboro, Maine.

 

116. John Laughton He was the son of 232. Samuel Laughton Jr and 233. Esther Alley. He married 117. Esther Davis Oct 21, 1740 in Concord, Massachusetts.

117. Esther Davis, born Sep 09, 1717 in Concord, Mass. She was the daughter of 234. James Davis and 235. Ann Smedley.

Child of John Laughton and Esther Davis is:

58 i. James Laughton, born Nov 21, 1741 in Concord, Massachusetts; died Jun 20, 1833; married Lydia Cushing Howland Dec 30, 1780.

 

118. Zebulon Howland, born Aug 12, 1739 in Pembroke,Plymouth,Mass; died Feb 19, 1824 in Avon, Franklin Co. Maine. He was the son of 236. Samuel Howland and 237. Mary Merrihew. He married 119. Lydia Cushing Jan 26, 1758 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass.

119. Lydia Cushing, born Mar 09, 1739/40 in Hingham, Mass; died Abt. Nov 1771. She was the daughter of 238. James J Cushing and 239. Mary Souther.

Notes for Zebulon Howland:

Reference in: Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.2, p. —Serial: ; Volume:

Massachusetts Army & Navy, the Revolution, 17 Vols

source; http://www.rootsweb.com/~mefrankl/spragcem.htm

SPRAGUE-HOWLAND CEMETERY Avon, Maine

directions; Leave Phillips On Route #149 South Toward Strong, Maine

Go 2.6 Miles, Cemetery Down Over the Banking On Right

In Pasture of "Old Voter Farm"

(the editors(flag) denotes a military affiliation)

HOWLAND (inscription)

Capt. Zebulon, d. 02-19-1824 in the 86th year

of his age. formerly of Bristol (flag)

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Reference in: Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots, Vol.2, p. —Serial: ; Volume:

Massachusetts Army & Navy, the Revolution, 17 Vols

Howland, Zebulon.2d Lieutenant, Capt. John Boyd's co. of matrosses stationed at Bristol; list of officers of Lincoln Co. militia; commissioned Aug. 21, 1777; also, 1st Lieutenant, in a company of matrosses, Col. Jones's (3d Lincoln Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; commissioned May 23, 1780.

More About Zebulon Howland:

Burial: SPRAGUE-HOWLAND CEMETERY Avon, Maine

Christening: Aug 12, 1739

Military service: 2d Lieutenant, Capt. John Boyd's co. of matrosses stationed at Bristol; list of officers of Lincoln Co. militia; commissioned Aug. 21, 1777; also, 1st Lieutenant, in a company of matrosses, Col. Jones's (3d Lincoln Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; list of offi

Children of Zebulon Howland and Lydia Cushing are:

59 i. Lydia Cushing Howland, born Apr 25, 1762 in Pembroke, Mass; died Aug 06, 1837 in Bristol, Maine; married James Laughton Dec 30, 1780.

ii. Briggs Howland, born Oct 26, 1768 in Wiscassett, Lincoln, Maine/Lincoln Co., ME; died Jul 18, 1855; married Abigail Murry Apr 03, 1790 in Edgecome, Maine.

 

120. Joseph Hibbert, born Bet. 1754 - 1757 in Haverhill (Essex) Massachusetts; died May 11, 1824 in New York. He was the son of 240. Daniel Hibbert and 241. Ruth Huse. He married 121. Dorothy Eastman.

121. Dorothy Eastman, born 1760; died Jan 25, 1846 in New York. She was the daughter of 242. Jeremiah Eastman and 243. Dorothy Carter.

More About Joseph Hibbert:

Military: Massachusetts

Child of Joseph Hibbert and Dorothy Eastman is:

60 i. Daniel Hibbert, born 1782 in Cornish, Maine; died Dec 08, 1850 in Somerville, Maine; married Judith Morrill 1802.

 

122. Thomas Morrill He was the son of 244. Peter Morrill and 245. Sarah Peaslee. He married 123. Abigail Johnson.

123. Abigail Johnson

Child of Thomas Morrill and Abigail Johnson is:

61 i. Judith Morrill, born Abt. 1775; died Nov 16, 1842; married Daniel Hibbert 1802.

 

Generation No. 8

144. Col. James Blair, born Bet. 1644 - 1650 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland; died Mar 10, 1705/06 in Aghadowney. He was the son of 288. David Blair. He married 145. Racheal Boyd Mar 10, 1699/00 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland.

145. Racheal Boyd, born Abt. 1644 in Scotland; died May 10, 1700 in Aghadowey, Co Londonderry, Ireland. She was the daughter of 290. Thomas Boyd.

Notes for Col. James Blair:

They emigrated from Londonderry, Ireland, aboard The Robert arriving 4 August 1718 in Boston, Massachusetts.

 

Notes for Racheal Boyd:

The Blair Family of New England By Miss Emily Wildre Leavitt, 1900, pg. 18-25

The descriptions and statements of Aghadowey are taken from a series of letters written by Miss Mary Semple of Monthill, Larne, County Antrim, Ulster Province, Ireland, who made a personal visit to the place and talked with the aged men, who recounted tales they had received from their grandsires.

Monthill (Ireland), 28th August, 1893

Dear Mr. Blair

"I was at a place called Craigs, seven miles beyond Ballymena and unexpectedly (received) information which may interest you. Robert Boyd, who lives at a place called Boydstown, in the parish of Craigs, gave me a history of his own family.

You may imagine my surprise when he began to tell of the Boyds being married among the Blairs of Aghadowey. He said the founder of his, and many more families, was one Thomas Boyd, a native of Oxfordshire, who settled at Craigs in 1573. He married Elizabeth Douglas, a daughter of Scotch parents who had settled at Craigs also.

This Thomas received a grant of land, of which his descendants still hold a part.

A son settled at Dungiven, County Derry, and was the grandfather of the Rachel Boyd who married James Blair, and father of the Rev. Mr. Boyd who went with the emigrants to New Hampshire.

I never met a more interesting old man than this Mr. Boyd. He took me around

his farm, and nearly every field had a history. A small river runs near the house, which is called the Red Ford, so named because it was surcharged with blood the three days when Cromwell's army fought that of Philim Roe O'huill 'till that place where the Irish leader was killed.' A large cairn marks his grave. He also showed me the spot where a church (with) a graveyard once stood in which many Boyds were buried. As it stood far from the public road, it was gradually neglected and now is a fair meadow. There are apple trees in his garden which were planted by an ancestor named Montfield Lyle Boyd, some two hundred years ago; he was a soldier and fought under the Duke of Marlborough at Blenheim...

I was told that one of the ships that carried the first emigrants was called "The Eagle's Wing" and another "The Lady Sellerooke." There is an old song about the emigrants going away in the ship "Lady Sellerooke" that left fair Londonderry."

Yours,

Mary Semple.

 

 

More About Racheal Boyd:

Burial: Mar 1699/00, Ch Of Ireland Ce, Aghadowey, Derry, No Ireland

Children of James Blair and Racheal Boyd are:

72 i. Robert Col. Blair, born 1683 in Aghadowey, Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland; died Oct 14, 1774 in Worcester, Massachuesetts; married Isabella Rankin in Aghodowey.

ii. William Blair, born 1682 in , , , Scotland; died Aug 23, 1724 in Framingham, , Ma.

More About William Blair:

Ancestral File Number: T7W7-XW

iii. Abraham Blair, born Abt. 1685 in <Agahdowney, , Scotland>.

More About Abraham Blair:

Ancestral File Number: N2P0-BP

iv. John Blair, born 1685 in Agahdowney, , Scotland; died 1769 in Fannett, Cumberland, Pa.

More About John Blair:

Ancestral File Number: GG4L-R9

 

146. David Rankin, born Abt. 1666 in Scotland; died Abt. 1750 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ireland.

Child of David Rankin is:

73 i. Isabella Rankin, born 1683 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ireland; died Feb 10, 1765 in Worchester, Massachusetts; married Robert Col. Blair in Aghodowey.

 

156. Ebenezer Cobb He married 157. Ruth Tinkham.

157. Ruth Tinkham She was the daughter of 314. Helkiah Tinkham and 315. Ruth Cooke.

Child of Ebenezer Cobb and Ruth Tinkham is:

78 i. Ebenezer Cobb, married Jerusha Cushman Oct 30, 1747.

 

158. Robert Cushman He married 159. Mary Mercy Washburn.

159. Mary Mercy Washburn

Child of Robert Cushman and Mary Washburn is:

79 i. Jerusha Cushman, born Jan 15, 1726/27 in Plymouth, Massachusetts; married Ebenezer Cobb Oct 30, 1747.

 

172. Micheal Stilphen He married 173. Suzanna ?.

173. Suzanna ?

Child of Micheal Stilphen and Suzanna ? is:

86 i. George Stilphen, married Mary Rittal Jan 12, 1773.

 

174. Francis Rittal He married 175. Lucy Houdelette.

175. Lucy Houdelette, born in France. She was the daughter of 350. Charles Estienne Houdelette and 351. Marie Louise Gallois.

Notes for Francis Rittal:

 

Francis Rittal was a tailor, who married Lucy Houdelette and lived on Dresden Neck, where they kept a tavern which in later years was known as 'Granny Rittal's Tavern.' In the Journal of Rear-Admiral Bartholomew Jones who, while in the merchant service in 1791, made a trip up the Kennebec in his ship's longboat, during which he passed the night at the tavern, is found a diverting glimpse of Rittal and his wife

'who had a family of two sons and four daughters. Two of the latter were extremely handsome, and the civility of the whole house induced me to take up my quarters there for the night. I therefore directed a small supper to be provided, and at nine o'clock sat down to as comfortable a meal as I ever remember to have fed upon. The old man smoked his pipe and related his peregrinations and the difficulties he labored under in the American war; and the goodly wife prepared the feast, while the daughters, clad in homely apparel, did us the kindness to attend the table.' " (HOD, pg146) more on these difficulties to come. In Vol. 43. p. 153, Massachusetts Archives... has a story... It illustrates the methods sometimes taken by 'patriots' to involve in trouble those who were suspected of Tory proclivities. Francis Rittal was a victim, and they were engaged in a scheme to obtain of him a quantity of corn by tendering depreciated paper money in payment. Rittal, or Ridley, as they called him, declined and

'the combination then procured a little silver and gave it to one. Dennis Lines, a very indigent fellow with a large family. Furnished with proper instructions, he repaired to Mr. Ridley, pleaded his necessity, and obtained half a bushel, for which he paid the above-mentioned silver, and then attempted to procure another half bushel for Kendall, and for that purpose offered the same paper bill which Kendall had offered before. Ridley, as might be expected, denied. No sooner had Lines returned to his employers and given the history of his traffic, than a violent clamor arose. It was instantly proclaimed abroad that Ridley had refused to take paper money and must therefore, be punished as a damned Tory. He was summoned before the court, but refused to appear. The mob then assembled at the liberty pole on the plains - this being near where Ridley lived, and proposed to tear down his buildings and plunder his estate. The case was finally compromised, & Ridley let off with a fine to be paid to Lines and Kendall, & other matters which amounted in all to more than eighty dollars.' "

The Will of Francis Rittal

I Francis Rittal of Pownalbourgh in the County of Lincoln and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Tailor, being in health of Body and sound Mind and Memory, and knowing that I must shortly put off this earthly tabernacle, do make this my last Will and Testament; that is to say, in the first Place I commend my Soul into the hands of God who gave it, and my Body to the Earth to decently buried at the discretion of my Executrix hereafter named, in Expectation that I shall receive the same again glorious & immortal at the Resurrection of the Just.

And as touching such worldy Estate as it hath pleased God to bestow upon me in this Life, I give devise and dispose of the same in manner following,

Imprimis- I will and order that all my just Debts and funeral Expenses be paid out of my Estate as soon as may be after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to my beloved Wife Lucy the Improvement of all my Estate real & personal till my youngest Child shall arrive to full age; she to take care of & provide for all my Children under age out of Income & profits of my said Estate until they shall respectively arrive to full Age; and when the youngest Child shall arrive to full Age, then my said Wife to have one Third of all the Personal Estate, & a third Part of the real Estate, during her Life --

Item I give to my Daughter Sally Theobald twenty shillings to be paid out of my Estate, by my Executrix, after my youngest Child arrives to full Age--

Item, I give & devise to my Children Molly Stilphen, Francis, John, Louis, Lucy, Nancy, Betsey & Charlotta all the rest and Residue of my Estate, real personal & mixed, wheresoever the same is or may be found, equally to be divided among them, when my said youngest Child shall attain to the age of twenty one years.

Lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my said Wife Lucy sole Executrix of this my last Will & Testament. In Testimony whereof I the said Francis Rittal do hereto set my hand and seal the twenty fifth day of April in the year of our Lord 1789---

Memo. The words, all my Children under Age, were interlin'd before seal'g.

Francis Rittal (seal)

The above Instrament was signed, sealed, and declared by the Testator to be his last Will & Testament in presence of us -- Edmd Bridge Phebe Bridge jun Edmund Bridge juneor Jon. Bowman

Probated 8 Jan., 1796

Inventory by Ezra Taylor, John Polereczky, and Jonathan Reed, all of Dresden, 13 Feb., 1796

[The Probate Records of Lincoln County, Maine 1760 to 1800, William Patterson, 1991, pp305-6]

 

More About Francis Rittal:

Fact 1 (2): lived on Dresden Neck

Occupation: tailor

Children of Francis Rittal and Lucy Houdelette are:

87 i. Mary Rittal, born Jun 17, 1757; married George Stilphen Jan 12, 1773.

ii. Sally Rittal, married Ernst Philip Theobald.

Notes for Ernst Philip Theobald:

[Master Tree.FTW]

GERMAN AUXILIARY SOLDIER WHO REMAINED IN NORTH AMERICA AFTER THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND WHOSE MILITARY SERVICE AND FAMILY HISTORIES HAVE BEEN RESEARCHED AND PUBLISHED OR DOCUMENTED BY THE JSHA

Hesse-Hanau, Doernigheim; Chaplain; Erb Prinz Co. 1; HETRINA Vol IV; Deserted 2 Nov. 1779 at Charlottsville, VA; Married Sally Rittal at Dresden, ME; Article in JSHA 1998 Journal.[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

GERMAN AUXILIARY SOLDIER WHO REMAINED IN NORTH AMERICA AFTER THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND WHOSE MILITARY SERVICE AND FAMILY HISTORIES HAVE BEEN RESEARCHED AND PUBLISHED OR DOCUMENTED BY THE JSHA

Hesse-Hanau, Doernigheim; Chaplain; Erb Prinz Co. 1; HETRINA Vol IV; Deserted 2 Nov. 1779 at Charlottsville, VA; Married Sally Rittal at Dresden, ME; Article in JSHA 1998 Journal.

 

194. Laurentius Seitz, born Oct 20, 1696 in Eidesheim/Lorch, Würtemberg, Germany; died May 27, 1757 in Broad Bay, Maine. He married 195. Anna Margaretha Actnuderer Nov 19, 1726 in Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany.

195. Anna Margaretha Actnuderer, born Jul 06, 1702 in Otisheim/Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, Germany; died in Otisheim/Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, Germany. She was the daughter of 390. Peter Wunnderer.

Notes for Laurentius Seitz:

1757-Lincoln County, Maine--- Sietz, Lorentz #127 Living at Broodyway Township(Broadbay)

--Laurentius Seiz or Seitz came to Broad Bay, Maine, in 1742 from Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, with his wife and two children. He served in the French and Indian War, taking his family along to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, for 3 years, then returned to Broad Bay. He was ambushed and killed by Indians on his farm in 1757.

From the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher, baptized Oct. 20, 1696

From "Lists for the Germans of Waldoboro, Maine":

Arrived in America in 1742 on the ship "Lydia"(along with the Voglers).

Served in King George's War(1744-1748).

May 13, 1754: "Poor deserted Germans" petn. The settlers are exposed to likely Indian attacks and face starvation. Broadbay has "above 130 families" with "almost 500 souls". Aside from the 18 signers, there are others, "who living very much dispersed, can not always assemble.":

Served in the French and Indian War(1754-1763).

Possibly listed as a French and Indian War civilian victim(Killed in Indian Raid; Loring Sides).

Was on a petition in Oct. 1757 as Lorentz Seitz. (Therefore his death would have to be Oct-Dec 1757)

 

 

Seiz, Seitz or Sides Family

 

Laurentius Seiz or Seitz came to Broad Bay, Maine, in 1742 from Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, with his wife, born Anna Maria Actnuderer, and two children. He served in the French and Indian War, taking his family along to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, for three years, then returned to Broad Bay. He was ambushed and killed by Indians on his farm in 1757.

Note: the German spelling of this name is SEIZ. Early American records usually render it SEITZ. By mid-19th century it had become SIDES, the modern spelling.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

1757-Lincoln County, Maine--- Sietz, Lorentz #127 Living at Broodyway Township(Broadbay)

--Laurentius Seiz or Seitz came to Broad Bay, Maine, in 1742 from Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, with his wife and two children. He served in the French and Indian War, taking his family along to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, for 3 years, then returned to Broad Bay. He was ambushed and killed by Indians on his farm in 1757.

From the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher, baptized Oct. 20, 1696

From "Lists for the Germans of Waldoboro, Maine":

Arrived in America in 1742 on the ship "Lydia"(along with the Voglers).

Served in King George's War(1744-1748).

May 13, 1754: "Poor deserted Germans" petn. The settlers are exposed to likely Indian attacks and face starvation. Broadbay has "above 130 families" with "almost 500 souls". Aside from the 18 signers, there are others, "who living very much dispersed, can not always assemble.":

Served in the French and Indian War(1754-1763).

Possibly listed as a French and Indian War civilian victim(Killed in Indian Raid; Loring Sides).

Was on a petition in Oct. 1757 as Lorentz Seitz. (Therefore his death would have to be Oct-Dec 1757)

 

 

Seiz, Seitz or Sides Family

 

Laurentius Seiz or Seitz came to Broad Bay, Maine, in 1742 from Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, with his wife, born Anna Maria Actnuderer, and two children. He served in the French and Indian War, taking his family along to Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, for three years, then returned to Broad Bay. He was ambushed and killed by Indians on his farm in 1757.

Note: the German spelling of this name is SEIZ. Early American records usually render it SEITZ. By mid-19th century it had become SIDES, the modern spelling.

 

More About Laurentius Seitz:

Christening: Oct 20, 1696, Lorch

Immigration: 1742, came to Broad Bay, Maine from Eitesheim,Wurttemburg

Occupation: Baker

Notes for Anna Margaretha Actnuderer:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Notes from Werner: 11-2000, The girl is described as 'unlegal' because her parents 'generated' her before they were married, and that was on Marth 6, 1713; but the pastor declares the mother of the girl as 'uxor' of Peter Wunnderer

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Notes from Werner: 11-2000, The girl is described as 'unlegal' because her parents 'generated' her before they were married, and that was on Marth 6, 1713; but the pastor declares the mother of the girl as 'uxor' of Peter Wunnderer

Children of Laurentius Seitz and Anna Actnuderer are:

i. Anna Katharina Seitz, born Nov 29, 1732 in Eidesheim (Otisheim ?) Würtemberg, Germany; died Oct 1770 in Cross Creek, Fayetteville, NC; married Phillipp Christoph Vogler 1746 in Louisburg, Cape Breton Is., Nova Scotia; born Apr 02, 1723 in Gondelsheim, Baden, Germany; died Aug 20, 1790 in Bethania, Stokes, NC.

Notes for Anna Katharina Seitz:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Anna Seitz Vogler died in Nov. or Dec. of 1770 in Cross Creek, NC, during the trip from Broad Bay, Maine, to Salem, NC.

"November 5, 1770-- news was received that more families from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th.

--David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except for Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek(North Carolina).Anna Seitz Vogler died in Nov. or Dec. of 1770 in Cross Creek, NC, during the trip from Broad Bay, Maine, to Salem, NC.

"November 5, 1770-- news was received that more families from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th.

--David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except for Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek(North Carolina).

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Anna Seitz Vogler died in Nov. or Dec. of 1770 in Cross Creek, NC, during the trip from Broad Bay, Maine, to Salem, NC.

"November 5, 1770-- news was received that more families from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th.

--David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except for Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek(North Carolina).Anna Seitz Vogler died in Nov. or Dec. of 1770 in Cross Creek, NC, during the trip from Broad Bay, Maine, to Salem, NC.

"November 5, 1770-- news was received that more families from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th.

--David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except for Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek(North Carolina).

 

Notes for Phillipp Christoph Vogler:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

During the winter of 1741/42, 19 year old Philipp Christoph Vogler and his father, Hans Georg Vogler, left the other members of the family, including Hans Georg's daughter and his second wife, Anna Maria for North America. They arrived in October, 1742 aboard the ship Lydia, along with about 50 other passengers at Broad Bay, Maine (present-day Waldoboro).

On November 5, 1770, news was received in Salem that more families (some came down the year before) from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th. David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek, NC.

Served in the French and Indian War(1754-1763) and King George's War(1744-1748)

1757-Lincoln Co, Maine--Vogler, Philipp #128, Broodyway Twp.(Broadbay).

-Information from the Moravian Archives at Winston-Salem, NC-08-2000--gave birth year as 1725, but this conflicts with brother Rudolf's birth, and also with the the above paragraph concerning his arrival at age 19.

From his memoir--He was brought up in the Lutheran faith. Along with farming he learned the trade of Tailor. He served in the French and Indian War for 3 or 4 years, where he was on Cape Breton. Around 1761 he heard some of the Brethren of the Moravian Church, and decided to join with them. He and his family, minus son John who stayed in New England, went to North Carolina in 1770. They arrived in November 1770.

Info from the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--Hans went with Col. Samuel Waldo on the Cape Breton Expedition to Louisbourg with his oldest son Philip and with Sebastian Zouberbuhler in 1744 & 1745.

From "Lists of the Germans in Waldoboro, Maine":

May 13, 1754: "Poor deserted Germans" petn. The settlers are exposed to likely Indian attacks and face starvation. Broadbay has "above 130 families" with "almost 500 souls". Aside from the 18 signers, there are others, "who living very much dispersed, can not always assemble.":

Vogler, Phillip

Close of 1764, Broadbay Maine: Listed as a Moravian Sympathizer, those who regularly attended Rev. Soelle's services: Philip & Katherina Vogler

Sept. 5, 1770: Further Departures of Moravians to North Carolina:

Vogeler, Philip[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

During the winter of 1741/42, 19 year old Philipp Christoph Vogler and his father, Hans Georg Vogler, left the other members of the family, including Hans Georg's daughter and his second wife, Anna Maria for North America. They arrived in October, 1742 aboard the ship Lydia, along with about 50 other passengers at Broad Bay, Maine (present-day Waldoboro).

On November 5, 1770, news was received in Salem that more families (some came down the year before) from Broad Bay had reached Carolina, and that Br. George Soelle was with them; he arrived December 6th. David Rominger's wife and the Vogler family came on the 12th, except Mrs. Vogler, who had died in Cross Creek, NC.

Served in the French and Indian War(1754-1763) and King George's War(1744-1748)

1757-Lincoln Co, Maine--Vogler, Philipp #128, Broodyway Twp.(Broadbay).

-Information from the Moravian Archives at Winston-Salem, NC-08-2000--gave birth year as 1725, but this conflicts with brother Rudolf's birth, and also with the the above paragraph concerning his arrival at age 19.

From his memoir--He was brought up in the Lutheran faith. Along with farming he learned the trade of Tailor. He served in the French and Indian War for 3 or 4 years, where he was on Cape Breton. Around 1761 he heard some of the Brethren of the Moravian Church, and decided to join with them. He and his family, minus son John who stayed in New England, went to North Carolina in 1770. They arrived in November 1770.

Info from the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--Hans went with Col. Samuel Waldo on the Cape Breton Expedition to Louisbourg with his oldest son Philip and with Sebastian Zouberbuhler in 1744 & 1745.

From "Lists of the Germans in Waldoboro, Maine":

May 13, 1754: "Poor deserted Germans" petn. The settlers are exposed to likely Indian attacks and face starvation. Broadbay has "above 130 families" with "almost 500 souls". Aside from the 18 signers, there are others, "who living very much dispersed, can not always assemble.":

Vogler, Phillip

Close of 1764, Broadbay Maine: Listed as a Moravian Sympathizer, those who regularly attended Rev. Soelle's services: Philip & Katherina Vogler

Sept. 5, 1770: Further Departures of Moravians to North Carolina:

Vogeler, Philip

More About Phillipp Christoph Vogler:

Burial: Bethania Moravian Graveyard, Bethania, Forsythe Co., NC

First Communion: Jan 1781, Moravian Church, Bethania, North Carolina

Military: Bet. 1742 - 1746, Indian War on Cape Breton, ME

Occupation: farmer , tailor

Religeon: Lutheran , Moravian

Residense: 1742, Broad Bay, ME

Residense (2): 1770, Friedland, , NC

97 ii. Elisabetha Barbara Seitz, born Dec 30, 1734 in Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany; married Johann Henry Lehr.

iii. Johann Michael Seitz, born Apr 15, 1736 in Eidesheim/Heidesheim, Würtemberg, Germany; died Jan 03, 1817 in Freidland, Forsyth, North Carolina; married Philippina Elisabeth Rominger Jun 1761 in Boston, Massachusetts; born Sep 29, 1743 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine; died in Friedland, Stokes (now Forsyth) County, North Carolina.

Notes for Johann Michael Seitz:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Info from Moravian records at Winston-Salem.

Close of 1764, Broadbay Maine: Listed as a Moravian Sympathizer, those who regularly attended Rev. Soelle's services: Seitz, Michael and Elizabeth.

August 1769: Moravians departing to North Carolina: Seitz, John Michael and wife Elizabeth.He was in Friedland, Rowan (now Forsyth) County, NC with his wife and her 12 year old sister, Juliana, in 1769. He was living in Bethania, Surry County, NC in 1771. He was living on Town Fork Creek near Germanton, NC in 1772. He was living in Friedland, Surry 9now Forsyth) County, NC on 200m acres west and north of church tract in Mar 1773. He was drafted by Gove with his team & wagon for survey of the NC-VA line westward to KY in 1779. He was his teams hailed supplies to Gen. Greene in 1781. He was listed in Surry (now Forsyth) County, NC Tax Tables with 400 acres in 1786 in Captain Krous' District.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Info from Moravian records at Winston-Salem.

Close of 1764, Broadbay Maine: Listed as a Moravian Sympathizer, those who regularly attended Rev. Soelle's services: Seitz, Michael and Elizabeth.

August 1769: Moravians departing to North Carolina: Seitz, John Michael and wife Elizabeth.He was in Friedland, Rowan (now Forsyth) County, NC with his wife and her 12 year old sister, Juliana, in 1769. He was living in Bethania, Surry County, NC in 1771. He was living on Town Fork Creek near Germanton, NC in 1772. He was living in Friedland, Surry 9now Forsyth) County, NC on 200m acres west and north of church tract in Mar 1773. He was drafted by Gove with his team & wagon for survey of the NC-VA line westward to KY in 1779. He was his teams hailed supplies to Gen. Greene in 1781. He was listed in Surry (now Forsyth) County, NC Tax Tables with 400 acres in 1786 in Captain Krous' District.

 

 

More About Johann Michael Seitz:

Burial: Friedland Moravian Graveyard

More About Philippina Elisabeth Rominger:

Burial: Friedland Moravian God's Acre

iv. Rosina Margaretha Seitz, born Feb 22, 1740/41 in Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany.

Notes for Rosina Margaretha Seitz:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

From the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--birth and baptism year is 1741.[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

From the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--birth and baptism year is 1741.

More About Rosina Margaretha Seitz:

Baptism: Feb 23, 1740/41, Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany

v. Lorentz Seitz, born 1745 in Broadbay, New England; died Jun 1822 in Waldoboro, Maine.

Notes for Lorentz Seitz:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Info from Moran Website--birthyear 1745

from the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--gives birthyear as abt 1743.

From "Lists of the Germans in Waldoboro, Maine":

Aug. 19, 1772: 32 Dissidents of the John Newbert deed. Opposition to "Doctor" Schaeffer caused action by "reformed Lutherans". Almost all east-siders, these wanted to build anew:

Seitz, Lorenz

May 1773: East Side Settlers. Rec. from schoolmaster.

Seitz, Lorento, 26B[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Anna Maria.ged]

Info from Moran Website--birthyear 1745

from the book "Broad Bay Pioneers" by Whitaker & Horlacher--gives birthyear as abt 1743.

From "Lists of the Germans in Waldoboro, Maine":

Aug. 19, 1772: 32 Dissidents of the John Newbert deed. Opposition to "Doctor" Schaeffer caused action by "reformed Lutherans". Almost all east-siders, these wanted to build anew:

Seitz, Lorenz

May 1773: East Side Settlers. Rec. from schoolmaster.

Seitz, Lorento, 26B

 

200. Johann Conrad Ueberlach, born Abt. 1683 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany. He was the son of 400. Bernhardt Ueberlach. He married 201. Anna Catherine Benner Jun 08, 1704 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

201. Anna Catherine Benner She was the daughter of 402. Johannes Benner.

Child of Johann Ueberlach and Anna Benner is:

100 i. Johann Gottfriedt Oberlach, born May 28, 1717 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany; died Bef. 1790 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine; married (1) Elizabeth Dribble; married (2) Maria Cassandra Benner Nov 24, 1743 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

 

202. George Ludwig Benner, born Abt. 1691 in Eibach, Dillenburg, Hessen-Nassau, Germany/Dillenburg, Germany. He married 203. Elizabetha.

203. Elizabetha

Child of George Benner and Elizabetha is:

101 i. Maria Cassandra Benner, born Feb 19, 1724/25 in Eibach, Dillenburg, Hessen-Nassau, Germany/Dillenburg, Germany; died Aft. Jun 20, 1765 in Broad Bay, Waldoboro, Maine; married Johann Gottfriedt Oberlach Nov 24, 1743 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

 

232. Samuel Laughton Jr, born Mar 17, 1684/85 in Lynn, Essex, MA. He was the son of 464. Samuel Laughton and 465. Sarah Graves. He married 233. Esther Alley.

233. Esther Alley

Child of Samuel Jr and Esther Alley is:

116 i. John Laughton, married Esther Davis Oct 21, 1740 in Concord, Massachusetts.

 

234. James Davis, born Jan 19, 1667/68 in Concord, Mass; died Sep 16, 1727 in MA. He was the son of 468. Lieut. Simon Davis and 469. Mary Blood. He married 235. Ann Smedley 1701 in Concord, MA.

235. Ann Smedley, born Dec 12, 1676 in Concord, Mass; died May 21, 1761. She was the daughter of 470. John Smedley and 471. Sarah Wheeler.

Child of James Davis and Ann Smedley is:

117 i. Esther Davis, born Sep 09, 1717 in Concord, Mass; married John Laughton Oct 21, 1740 in Concord, Massachusetts.

 

236. Samuel Howland, born Abt. 1697 in Duxbury, Mass; died Abt. 1753. He was the son of 472. Abraham Howland and 473. Ann Rouse. He married 237. Mary Merrihew Jul 27, 1708 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Mass.

237. Mary Merrihew, born Abt. 1680 in Dartmouth, Mass.

More About Samuel Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-TTK

Children of Samuel Howland and Mary Merrihew are:

118 i. Zebulon Howland, born Aug 12, 1739 in Pembroke,Plymouth,Mass; died Feb 19, 1824 in Avon, Franklin Co. Maine; married Lydia Cushing Jan 26, 1758 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass.

ii. Caleb Howland, born in Pembroke, , Ma.

More About Caleb Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-V36

Christening: Aug 02, 1741, Pembroke, , Ma

iii. Ichabod Howland, born in Pembroke, , Ma.

More About Ichabod Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-VBM

Christening: Jan 13, 1754

iv. Samuel Howland, born in <Pembroke, , Ma>; died Feb 18, 1798 in Pembroke, , Ma; married Sarah Joy Oct 13, 1738; born 1720 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass; died Apr 04, 1809 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass.

More About Samuel Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-V5L

More About Sarah Joy:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-TVR

v. Ruth Howland, born 1748.

More About Ruth Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-V1R

Christening: Pembroke, , Ma

vi. Abigail Howland, born Abt. Oct 1748.

More About Abigail Howland:

Ancestral File Number: 17JG-V0K

Christening: Pembroke, , Ma

 

238. James J Cushing, born Sep 16, 1716. He was the son of 476. James M Cushing and 477. Mary Barrell. He married 239. Mary Souther.

239. Mary Souther, born 1716. She was the daughter of 478. Joseph Souther and 479. Content Tower.

Child of James Cushing and Mary Souther is:

119 i. Lydia Cushing, born Mar 09, 1739/40 in Hingham, Mass; died Abt. Nov 1771; married Zebulon Howland Jan 26, 1758 in Pembroke, Plymouth, Mass.

 

240. Daniel Hibbert, born 1728 in Metheun, Massachusetts; died Oct 23, 1771. He was the son of 480. John Hibbert and 481. Dorothy Graves. He married 241. Ruth Huse 1750 in Haverhill, Massachusetts.

241. Ruth Huse, born Abt. 1730.

Notes for Daniel Hibbert:

[Master Tree.FTW]

(reference N.H. Gazette 1765-1800) Daniel was killed accidently ay a falling tree in Sanford-Alfred, Maine. [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

(reference N.H. Gazette 1765-1800) Daniel was killed accidently ay a falling tree in Sanford-Alfred, Maine.

Children of Daniel Hibbert and Ruth Huse are:

i. Daniel Hibbert, born 1752; died 1822; married Sarah Walden.

120 ii. Joseph Hibbert, born Bet. 1754 - 1757 in Haverhill (Essex) Massachusetts; died May 11, 1824 in New York; married Dorothy Eastman.

iii. Israel Hibbert, born 1759.

iv. James Hibbert, born 1760.

v. Hannah Hibbert, born 1762.

vi. Lydia Hibbert

vii. John Hibbert

viii. Samuel Hibbert

 

242. Jeremiah Eastman, born Aug 25, 1719 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; died Jul 23, 1748. He was the son of 484. Ebenezer Eastman and 485. Sarah Peaslee. He married 243. Dorothy Carter Nov 29, 1744.

243. Dorothy Carter

Child of Jeremiah Eastman and Dorothy Carter is:

121 i. Dorothy Eastman, born 1760; died Jan 25, 1846 in New York; married Joseph Hibbert.

 

244. Peter Morrill, born Sep 16, 1709 in North Berwick, York, ME; died Nov 11, 1801 in North Berwick, York, ME. He was the son of 488. John Morrill and 489. Hannah Dixon. He married 245. Sarah Peaslee Oct 27, 1731 in Hampton, Rockingham, NH.

245. Sarah Peaslee, born Feb 20, 1708/09; died Jun 19, 1780. She was the daughter of 490. John Peaslee and 491. Mary Martin.

Children of Peter Morrill and Sarah Peaslee are:

122 i. Thomas Morrill, married Abigail Johnson.

ii. John Morrill, born Mar 10, 1733/34 in North Berwick York Maine; died Nov 02, 1816 in Falmouth Cumberland Maine.

 

Generation No. 9

288. David Blair, born Abt. 1618 in of Ayrshire, Scotland; died in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland. He was the son of 576. John Blair and 577. Beatrix Muir.

More About David Blair:

Ancestral File Number: W6FR-26

Children of David Blair are:

144 i. Col. James Blair, born Bet. 1644 - 1650 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland; died Mar 10, 1705/06 in Aghadowney; married Racheal Boyd Mar 10, 1699/00 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland.

ii. Abraham Blair, born Abt. 1644 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland.

 

290. Thomas Boyd

Child of Thomas Boyd is:

145 i. Racheal Boyd, born Abt. 1644 in Scotland; died May 10, 1700 in Aghadowey, Co Londonderry, Ireland; married Col. James Blair Mar 10, 1699/00 in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland.

 

314. Helkiah Tinkham, born Feb 08, 1654/55 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass. He was the son of 628. Ephraim Tinkham and 629. Mary Brown. He married 315. Ruth Cooke.

315. Ruth Cooke

Notes for Ruth Cooke:

[Master Tree.FTW]

Granddaughter of Francis Cooke and Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins, Mayflower Passengers

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Granddaughter of Francis Cooke and Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins, Mayflower Passengers

Child of Helkiah Tinkham and Ruth Cooke is:

157 i. Ruth Tinkham, married Ebenezer Cobb.

 

350. Charles Estienne Houdelette, born 1707 in France; died Oct 27, 1784. He married 351. Marie Louise Gallois.

351. Marie Louise Gallois, born 1702 in Mannheim Germany. She was the daughter of 702. Comte Gallois.

Notes for Charles Estienne Houdelette:

[Master Tree.FTW]

Charles Estienne Houdelette, Huguenot, was the founder of the Houdelette family in America...He was born in France in 1707, and during the persecution of Huguenots that followed the hollow Peace of 1748 fled with his family to Germany, thence by way of Rotterdam to Boston, landing there in 1751. He settled in what is now Dresden Maine, where he died in 1784." THF The Houdlette Family 1707-1909, Edith Houdlette, 1 Mar 1909

"Charles Estienne Houdelette is said to have been born in France in 1707. He was a lace manufacturer or weaver, and left a web in the loom when he left France. He went to Germany, but it is not known when, and sailed from Rotterdam, Holland on the ship Priscilla, John Brown, master, in 1751. Jacob Bailey says he was a Calvinist. Tradition says that his only son Louis was born in France....Houdelette appears to have been a man of considerable education. Probably he was quite well off in France, though in somewhat straitened circumstances here as is shown by a mortgage of his land to secure the amount of his passage money... Fred A. Houdelette, of Boston, says that the baptismal register has disappeared, but it is thought that Houdelette came from southern France and went to Mannheim, Germany." HOD History of Dresden Maine, pg 144-5

Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775.

HOUDELETTE, Charles Stephen, of Dresden and Frankfort, Me.; from France cir. 1752; lace weaver; b. 1707; Child: Louis; d. 1784, at Pownalboro, Me., aet. 77.—Maine Hist. Soc. Coll., 2d Series, vol. 3, p. 351; Allen’s Huguenots in Dresden, pp. 6, 7.

HOUDELETTE, Louis, of Dresden, Maine; Huguenot from France, cir. 1752; b. Sept. 8, 1746, son of Charles Stephen Houdelette; m. Mary Cavalear, Jan. 31, 1770, b. Nov. 15, 1748; d. 1835.—Allen’s Huguenots in Dresden, pp. 1, 6, 7, 8.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Charles Estienne Houdelette, Huguenot, was the founder of the Houdelette family in America...He was born in France in 1707, and during the persecution of Huguenots that followed the hollow Peace of 1748 fled with his family to Germany, thence by way of Rotterdam to Boston, landing there in 1751. He settled in what is now Dresden Maine, where he died in 1784." THF The Houdlette Family 1707-1909, Edith Houdlette, 1 Mar 1909

"Charles Estienne Houdelette is said to have been born in France in 1707. He was a lace manufacturer or weaver, and left a web in the loom when he left France. He went to Germany, but it is not known when, and sailed from Rotterdam, Holland on the ship Priscilla, John Brown, master, in 1751. Jacob Bailey says he was a Calvinist. Tradition says that his only son Louis was born in France....Houdelette appears to have been a man of considerable education. Probably he was quite well off in France, though in somewhat straitened circumstances here as is shown by a mortgage of his land to secure the amount of his passage money... Fred A. Houdelette, of Boston, says that the baptismal register has disappeared, but it is thought that Houdelette came from southern France and went to Mannheim, Germany." HOD History of Dresden Maine, pg 144-5

Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775.

HOUDELETTE, Charles Stephen, of Dresden and Frankfort, Me.; from France cir. 1752; lace weaver; b. 1707; Child: Louis; d. 1784, at Pownalboro, Me., aet. 77.—Maine Hist. Soc. Coll., 2d Series, vol. 3, p. 351; Allen’s Huguenots in Dresden, pp. 6, 7.

HOUDELETTE, Louis, of Dresden, Maine; Huguenot from France, cir. 1752; b. Sept. 8, 1746, son of Charles Stephen Houdelette; m. Mary Cavalear, Jan. 31, 1770, b. Nov. 15, 1748; d. 1835.—Allen’s Huguenots in Dresden, pp. 1, 6, 7, 8.

 

 

Notes for Marie Louise Gallois:

Tradition affirms that the firstwife was 'a high duke's niece,' and the name is sometimes spelled Gul wahe" (HOD, pg 144)

Child of Charles Houdelette and Marie Gallois is:

175 i. Lucy Houdelette, born in France; married Francis Rittal.

 

390. Peter Wunnderer, born Abt. 1680.

Child of Peter Wunnderer is:

195 i. Anna Margaretha Actnuderer, born Jul 06, 1702 in Otisheim/Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, Germany; died in Otisheim/Eitesheim, Wurttemburg, Germany; married Laurentius Seitz Nov 19, 1726 in Otisheim, Wurttemberg, Germany.

 

400. Bernhardt Ueberlach

Child of Bernhardt Ueberlach is:

200 i. Johann Conrad Ueberlach, born Abt. 1683 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany; married Anna Catherine Benner Jun 08, 1704 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

 

402. Johannes Benner

Child of Johannes Benner is:

201 i. Anna Catherine Benner, married Johann Conrad Ueberlach Jun 08, 1704 in Herborn, Hessen-Nassau, Germany.

 

464. Samuel Laughton, born Abt. 1658; died Mar 10, 1729/30. He was the son of 928. Thomas Laughton and 929. Sarah Lenthall. He married 465. Sarah Graves.

465. Sarah Graves She was the daughter of 930. Thomas Graves and 931. Hannah.

Child of Samuel Laughton and Sarah Graves is:

232 i. Samuel Laughton Jr, born Mar 17, 1684/85 in Lynn, Essex, MA; married Esther Alley.

 

468. Lieut. Simon Davis, born 1635 in Cambridge, MA; died Jun 14, 1713 in Concord, MA. He was the son of 936. Dolor Davis and 937. Margery Willard. He married 469. Mary Blood Dec 12, 1660 in Concord, MA.

469. Mary Blood, born Jul 12, 1640 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; died WFT Est. 1681-1735. She was the daughter of 938. James Blood and 939. Eleanor Harrison.

More About Mary Blood:

Baptism: Nov 24, 1925, LDS

Religion: Mormon

Children of Simon Davis and Mary Blood are:

234 i. James Davis, born Jan 19, 1667/68 in Concord, Mass; died Sep 16, 1727 in MA; married Ann Smedley 1701 in Concord, MA.

ii. Mary Davis, born Oct 03, 1663 in Concord, MA; died Jun 27, 1748 in MA; married Deliverance Wheeler May 28, 1691 in Concord, MA; born WFT Est. 1643-1671; died WFT Est. 1696-1756.

iii. Sarah Davis, born Mar 11, 1665/66 in Concord, MA; died WFT Est. 1700-1761; married Thomas Wheeler Nov 13, 1695 in Concord, MA; born WFT Est. 1646-1675; died WFT Est. 1700-1760.

iv. Eleanor Davis, born Oct 22, 1672 in Concord, MA; died WFT Est. 1704-1766; married Samuel Hunt May 14, 1699 in Concord, MA; born WFT Est. 1651-1679; died WFT Est. 1704-1764.

v. Ebenezer Davis, born Jun 01, 1676 in Concord, MA; died WFT Est. 1727-1768; married (1) Sarah Danforth WFT Est. 1707-1739; born 1677; died Oct 15, 1751 in Concord, MA; married (2) Dinah Brown Feb 14, 1699/00 in Concord, MA; born Feb 04, 1676/77 in Chelmsford, MA; died WFT Est. 1717-1772.

vi. Hannah Davis, born Apr 01, 1679 in Concord, MA; died WFT Est. 1707-1773; married Samuel Blood Apr 01, 1701 in Concord, MA; born WFT Est. 1655-1681; died WFT Est. 1706-1768.

 

470. John Smedley, born Aug 31, 1646 in Concord, Mass; died Feb 06, 1716/17 in Concord, Mass. He was the son of 940. John Smedley and 941. Ann Walden. He married 471. Sarah Wheeler May 05, 1669.

471. Sarah Wheeler, born in Concord, Mass. She was the daughter of 942. Thomas Wheeler and 943. Sarah Merian.

Child of John Smedley and Sarah Wheeler is:

235 i. Ann Smedley, born Dec 12, 1676 in Concord, Mass; died May 21, 1761; married James Davis 1701 in Concord, MA.

 

472. Abraham Howland, born May 09, 1675 in Freetown, Bristol, Mass; died Jun 15, 1747 in Hanson, Mass. He was the son of 944. Samual Howland and 945. Mary Sampson. He married 473. Ann Rouse.

473. Ann Rouse

Child of Abraham Howland and Ann Rouse is:

236 i. Samuel Howland, born Abt. 1697 in Duxbury, Mass; died Abt. 1753; married Mary Merrihew Jul 27, 1708 in Dartmouth, Bristol, Mass.

 

476. James M Cushing He was the son of 952. John Cushing and 953. Sarah Hawke. He married 477. Mary Barrell Dec 10, 1713.

477. Mary Barrell, born Sep 10, 1686. She was the daughter of 954. William Barrrell and 955. Lydia.

Child of James Cushing and Mary Barrell is:

238 i. James J Cushing, born Sep 16, 1716; married Mary Souther.

 

478. Joseph Souther, born Feb 27, 1684/85 in Boston, Massachusetts; died Jul 22, 1740 in Hingham, Massachusetts. He was the son of 956. Joseph Souther. He married 479. Content Tower Apr 22, 1708.

479. Content Tower, born Jan 13, 1682/83; died Dec 18, 1730. She was the daughter of 958. Ibrook Tower and 959. Margaret Harding.

Children of Joseph Souther and Content Tower are:

239 i. Mary Souther, born 1716; married James J Cushing.

ii. Joseph Souther, born 1719; died 1808.

iii. Dainel Souther, born Aug 13, 1727 in Hingham, Plymouth, MA; married Judith Lobdell Apr 24, 1759 in Hull, Plymouth, MA; born 1735; died 1801.

Notes for Dainel Souther:

[Master Tree.FTW]

Daniel and his wife settled in the town of Hull where he became a man of prominence, especially during the War of the Revolution. Richard Derby of Salem reported, October 3, 1776 that on the previous evening the brigantine Massachusetts, "belonging to this State, aryved here." She bad been cruising during September under the command of Captain Daniel Souther, who, Derby says, "Informs me that a few Days after he sailed he fell in with & Took a Brigantine of about 250 Tons from Falmouth in England mounting six three pound Cannon & having on board a Captain & about 20 Privates of the 16th Regiment of Dragoons, with their Horse Accoutrements . . . He parted from the Prize this Day week in a Storm which has Continued almost ever since, but as the wind has been favourable this Day or two I Expect every moment to see or to hear of her being aryved at Boston. The prisoners in all amount to 35 which Cap Souther tho't too many to Cary the Cruise with him & therefor tho't best to Return & Land them, Espetially as he Expected to Do it in a few Days, but Gales of wind have prevented him. The Honble Board I hope will send me Directions how to Dispose of the Prisoners . . . They say the People in Brittain know Nothing what is passing in America & Capt Souther Informs me the Chaplain has told him the People in England begin to grow very weary." (Massachusetts Mag., October, 1908; Boston Gazette, October 7, 1776.)

Daniel and Judith were buried in the Hull Municipal Burying Ground, in the old section, near the crest of the hill overlooking the bay.

A paragraph found in Massachusetts: A Guide to the Pilgrim State, edited by Ray Bearse, (Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1971), refers to Daniel Souther and his home at Hull, MA.

"Cushing House (Private), northeast of the center on Spring Street, was built in 1725. The two and a half story house, once owned by Royal Navy Captain Daniel Souther, a Cushing relative, was visited by Revolutionary firebrand James Otis.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Daniel and his wife settled in the town of Hull where he became a man of prominence, especially during the War of the Revolution. Richard Derby of Salem reported, October 3, 1776 that on the previous evening the brigantine Massachusetts, "belonging to this State, aryved here." She bad been cruising during September under the command of Captain Daniel Souther, who, Derby says, "Informs me that a few Days after he sailed he fell in with & Took a Brigantine of about 250 Tons from Falmouth in England mounting six three pound Cannon & having on board a Captain & about 20 Privates of the 16th Regiment of Dragoons, with their Horse Accoutrements . . . He parted from the Prize this Day week in a Storm which has Continued almost ever since, but as the wind has been favourable this Day or two I Expect every moment to see or to hear of her being aryved at Boston. The prisoners in all amount to 35 which Cap Souther tho't too many to Cary the Cruise with him & therefor tho't best to Return & Land them, Espetially as he Expected to Do it in a few Days, but Gales of wind have prevented him. The Honble Board I hope will send me Directions how to Dispose of the Prisoners . . . They say the People in Brittain know Nothing what is passing in America & Capt Souther Informs me the Chaplain has told him the People in England begin to grow very weary." (Massachusetts Mag., October, 1908; Boston Gazette, October 7, 1776.)

Daniel and Judith were buried in the Hull Municipal Burying Ground, in the old section, near the crest of the hill overlooking the bay.

A paragraph found in Massachusetts: A Guide to the Pilgrim State, edited by Ray Bearse, (Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1971), refers to Daniel Souther and his home at Hull, MA.

"Cushing House (Private), northeast of the center on Spring Street, was built in 1725. The two and a half story house, once owned by Royal Navy Captain Daniel Souther, a Cushing relative, was visited by Revolutionary firebrand James Otis.

 

More About Dainel Souther:

Military service: 1776, Royal Navy Captain Daniel Souther

 

480. John Hibbert, born Jun 04, 1682 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died May 03, 1752 in Metheun, Massachusetts. He was the son of 960. John Hibbert and 961. Ruth Walden. He married 481. Dorothy Graves Jun 06, 1708 in Beverly, Massachusetts.

481. Dorothy Graves, born Jul 21, 1684 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died Aug 16, 1766 in Metheun, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 962. Capt. Ebenezer Graves and 473. Ann Rouse.

Notes for John Hibbert:

[Master Tree.FTW]

GENEAOLOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine Geroge Hibbard, 1901, p. 22

John first resided in Lynn, later in Beverly, Andover, Haverhill and Methuen. In Registry of Deeds, B. 97, p. 296: "John Hebbert of Methuen, yoeman, from love to son Joseph Hebbert of Methuen," March 6, 1750, deeds his property.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

GENEAOLOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine Geroge Hibbard, 1901, p. 22

John first resided in Lynn, later in Beverly, Andover, Haverhill and Methuen. In Registry of Deeds, B. 97, p. 296: "John Hebbert of Methuen, yoeman, from love to son Joseph Hebbert of Methuen," March 6, 1750, deeds his property.

 

 

More About John Hibbert:

Baptism: Jun 04, 1682, Beverly, Massachusetts

Children of John Hibbert and Dorothy Graves are:

i. Elisabeth Hibbert, born 1709.

ii. Ebenezer Hibbert, born 1710.

iii. John Hibbert, born 1716.

iv. Joseph Hibbert, born 1726.

240 v. Daniel Hibbert, born 1728 in Metheun, Massachusetts; died Oct 23, 1771; married Ruth Huse 1750 in Haverhill, Massachusetts.

vi. Ruth Hibbert, born 1730.

 

484. Ebenezer Eastman, born Bet. Feb 17, 1680/81 - Jan 10, 1686/87 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; died Jul 23, 1748. He was the son of 968. Phillip Eastman and 969. Mary (Barnard) Morse. He married 485. Sarah Peaslee Mar 04, 1709/10.

485. Sarah Peaslee, born Aug 15, 1690. She was the daughter of 970. Joseph Peaslee and 971. Ruth Barnard.

Child of Ebenezer Eastman and Sarah Peaslee is:

242 i. Jeremiah Eastman, born Aug 25, 1719 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; died Jul 23, 1748; married Dorothy Carter Nov 29, 1744.

 

488. John Morrill, born 1675 in Old Kittery, York, ME; died 1763 in North Berwick, York, Maine. He was the son of 976. John Morrill and 977. Sarah Hodson. He married 489. Hannah Dixon Dec 16, 1701 in Kittery, York, ME.

489. Hannah Dixon, born Feb 03, 1683/84 in Kittery, York, Maine; died Dec 20, 1765 in North Berwick York Maine. She was the daughter of 978. Peter Dixon and 979. Mary Remick.

More About John Morrill:

Will: 1756 proved 1763

Child of John Morrill and Hannah Dixon is:

244 i. Peter Morrill, born Sep 16, 1709 in North Berwick, York, ME; died Nov 11, 1801 in North Berwick, York, ME; married Sarah Peaslee Oct 27, 1731 in Hampton, Rockingham, NH.

 

490. John Peaslee He was the son of 970. Joseph Peaslee and 971. Ruth Barnard. He married 491. Mary Martin May 01, 1705.

491. Mary Martin

Child of John Peaslee and Mary Martin is:

245 i. Sarah Peaslee, born Feb 20, 1708/09; died Jun 19, 1780; married Peter Morrill Oct 27, 1731 in Hampton, Rockingham, NH.

 

Generation No. 10

576. John Blair He married 577. Beatrix Muir.

577. Beatrix Muir

Children of John Blair and Beatrix Muir are:

288 i. David Blair, born Abt. 1618 in of Ayrshire, Scotland; died in Aghadowey, Antrim, Ulster, Ireland.

ii. Robert Blair, born 1593 in Irvine, in Ayrshire, Scotland/Irvine, Scotland; married Catherine Montgomery.

Notes for Robert Blair:

Robert Blair was born at Irvine in the year 1593. His father was John Blair of Windyedge, a younger brother of the ancient and honourable family of Blair of that ilk; his mother was Beatrix Muir, of the ancient family of Rowallan. His father died when he was young, leaving his mother with six children, of whom Robert was the youngest. She continued nearly fifty years a widow, and lived till she was an hundred years old.

Robert entered the College of Glasgow, about the year 1608, where he studied hard, and made great progress; but lest he should have been puffed up with his proficiency, as he himself observes, the Lord was pleased to visit him with a tertian fever, for full four months, to the great detriment of his studies.

Nothing remarkable occurred till the 20th year of his age, when he gave himself sometimes to the exercise of archery, and the like recreations; but lest his studies should have been hindered, he resolved to be busy at them every other night, and, for that purpose, could find no place so proper as a room whereunto none were inclined to go, by reason of an apparition that was said to frequent it. Yea, it is said, that he himself had here seen the devil, in the likeness of one of his fellow-students, whom he took to be really his companion; but chasing him to the corner of the room, and offering to pull him out, he found nothing; at which, however, he was not at all troubled, studying the one part of the night without fear, and sleeping the other very sweetly, believing in Him who was still his great Preserver and Protector for ever.

Having now finished his course of philosophy, under the discipline of his own brother, Mr William Blair, who was afterwards minister at Dumbarton, he engaged for some time to be an assistant to an aged schoolmaster at Glasgow, who had above 300 scholars under his instruction, the half of whom were committed to the charge of Mr Blair. At this time he was called, by the ministry of the famous Mr Boyd of Trochrig, then principal of the College of Glasgow; into whose hand, as he himself observes in his Memoirs, the Lord did put the key of his heart so, that whenever he heard him in public or private, he profited much; Mr Boyd being, as it were, sent to him from God, to speak the words of eternal life.

Two years after, he was admitted in the room of his brother, Mr William, to be regent in the College of Glasgow, though not without the opposition of Archbishop Law, who had promised that place to another. But neither the principal nor regents giving place to the Archbishop’s motion, Mr Blair was admitted. After his admission, his elder colleagues, perceiving what great skill and insight he had in Humanity, urged him to read the classical authors; whereupon he began and read Plautus. But the Lord, being displeased with that design, diverted him from it, by his meeting with Augustine’s Confessions, wherein he inveighs sharply against the education of youth in heathen writings. Upon this he betook himself to the reading of the Holy Scriptures, and the ancient fathers, especially Augustine, who had another relish; and though he perceived that our divines were more sound than several of the ancients, yet, in his spare hours, he was wont to peruse the ancient authors, wherein he made considerable progress.

In summer 1616, he entered on trials for the ministry; and it was laid upon him to preach in the College Kirk the first Sabbath after his license. Some years after, he was told by some of his hearers (who were better acquainted with religion than he was then) that in his sermon the Lord did speak to their hearts; which not only surprised him, but also stirred him to follow after the Lord.

Upon an evening the same year, having been engaged with some irreligious company, when he returned to his chamber to his wonted devotion, he was threatened to be deserted of God. He had a restless night, and on the morrow resolved on a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer. Towards the end of that day, he found access to God with sweet peace, through Jesus Christ, and turned to beware of such company; but running into another extreme of rudeness and incivility to profane persons, he found it was very hard for shortsighted sinners to hold the right and the straight way.

While he was regent in the college, upon a report that some sinful oath was to be imposed upon the masters, he inquired at Mr Gavin Forsyth, one of his fellow-regents, what he would do in this? He answered, "By my faith, I must live!" Blair said, "Sir, I will not swear by my faith, as you do, but truly I intend to live by my faith; you may choose your own way, but I will adventure on the Lord." And so this man, to whom the matter of an oath was a small thing, did continue, after he was gone; but it is to be noticed, that he was many years in such poverty, as forced him to supplicate the General Assembly for some relief. Robert Blair (who was then moderator) upon his appearing in such a desperate case, could not shun observing that former passage of his, and upon meeting him in private, with great tenderness put him in mind, that he had been truly carried through by his faith, at which he had formerly scoffed.

Some time after Robert Blair was a regent in the college, he was under deep exercises of soul, wherein he attained unto much comfort. Among other things, that great saying, "the just shall live by faith," sounded loudly in his ears, which put him on a new search of the Scriptures, in which he went on till Mr Culverwell’s Treatise on Faith came out; which being of the same nature with what is since published by the Westminster Assembly, he was thereby much satisfied and comforted. "By this study of the nature of faith," says he, "and especially of the text before mentioned, I learned –

First, That nominal Christians, or common professors, were much deluded in their way of believing; and that not only Papists – who place faith in an implicit assent to the truth which they know not, and that it’s better defined by ignorance than by knowledge, (a way of believing very suitable to Antichrist’s slaves, who are led by the noses they know not which way), ‘were hugely herein mistaken,’ – but also secure Protestants, abusing the description of old given of faith, that it is an assurance or assured knowledge, of the love of God in Christ. This assurance, indeed, no doubt is attainable, and many believers do attain and comfortably enjoy it, as our divines from the Holy Scriptures prove unanswerably against the Popish doctors, who maintain the necessity of perpetual doubting, and miscall that Christian comfortable assurance of the Protestants’ presumption. But notwithstanding it is true of a high degree of faith, yet it agrees not to all the degrees of saving faith; so that hereby many gracious sound believers, who have received Jesus Christ, and rested on Him as He is offered to them in the Word, have been much puzzled, as if they were not believers at all. But, upon the other hand, many secure, unhumbled misbelievers, who have not believed in the Lord’s holiness and hating of sin, who have not believed how self-destroyed they are, out of self-love, without the warrant of the Word, conceit themselves to be beloved of God; and that the formerly mentioned description of faith agrees well to them.

Secondly, I perceived that many who make right use of faith in order to their justification, made not directly use thereof in order to sanctification. But then I perceived that the living of the just by faith reached further than I formerly conceived, and that the heart is purified by faith. If any think, What! knew I not till then that precious faith, being a grace, was not only a part of our holiness, but did set forward other parts of holiness? I answer, I did indeed know, and so accordingly made use of faith as a motive to stir up to holiness, according to the apostle’s exhortation: ‘Having, therefore, these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of the Lord’ (2 Cor. 7:1). But I had not, before that, learned to make use of faith as a mean and instrument to draw holiness out of Christ, the well of salvation, though it may be I had both heard that and spoken that by way of a transient notion; but then, I learned to purpose that they who receive forgiveness of sins are sanctified through faith in Christ, as our glorious Saviour taught Paul (Acts 26:18). Then I marvelled not that my progress met with an obstruction for not making use of faith, as hath been said, for sanctification. Then I perceived, that in making use of Christ for sanctification, without direct employing of faith to extract the same out of Him, I was like one seeking water out of a deep well, without a long cord to let down the bucket and draw it up again…. Then was I like one that came to the storehouse, but got my provisions reached to me as it were by a window. I had come to the right house, but not to the right door. But by this ‘new’ discovery I did find a patent door made for provision and furniture in and from Christ my Lord. So, blessed Lord, thou trainedst on thy poor servant, step by step, suffering difficulties to arise, that greater clearing from thyself might flow in.

I hoped then to make better progress with less stumbling; but not long after, encountering difficulties, I wondered what discovery would next clear the way. Then I found that the Spirit of holiness, whose immediate and appropriate work was to sanctify, had been slighted, and so grieved. For though the Holy Spirit had been teaching, and I had been speaking of Him and to Him frequently, and seeking the pouring out of the same, and urging others to seek the same, yet that discovery appeared to me a new practical lesson; and so I laboured more to crave, cherish, and not grieve or quench the Holy Spirit, praying to be led into all truth, according to the Scriptures, by that blessed guide; and that by that heavenly Comforter, I might be comforted in all troubles, and sealed up thereby in strong assurance of my interest in God.

About that time the Lord set me a work to stir up the students who were under my discipline earnestly to study piety, and to be diligent in secret seeking of the Lord; and my gracious Lord was pleased herein to bless my endeavours."

Dr John Cameron being brought from France, and settled principal of the college in Mr Boyd’s place, and being wholly set on in promoting the cause of Episcopacy, urged Robert Blair to conform to the Perth Articles, but he utterly refused. And it being a thing usual in these days for the regents to meet to dispute some thesis, for their better improvement, Blair had the advantage of his opponent, who was a French student, and maintained that election did proceed upon foreseen faith. But the Doctor having stated himself in opposition to Blair, in a way which tended to Arminianism, and Blair being urged to a second dispute by the Doctor himself, he did drive him to the mire of Arminianism, so as did redound much to the Doctor’s ignominy afterwards; and although he and Mr Blair were afterwards reconciled, yet, being nettled by that dispute, he improved all occasions against him.

For that purpose, when Blair was on a visit to some of his godly friends and acquaintances, he caused one Gardner to search his Prelections on Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, who, finding some things capable of being wrested, brought them to the Doctor, who presented them to the Archbishop of Glasgow. This coming to Mr Blair’s ears, he was so far from betraying innocence, being assured the Lord would clear his integrity, that he prepared a written apology, and desired a public hearing before the ministers and magistrates of the city; which being granted, he managed the point so properly, that all present professed their entire satisfaction with him; yea, one of the ministers of the city, who had been influenced against him formerly, said, in the face of that meeting, "Would to God King James had been present and heard what answers that man hath given."

Such a powerful antagonist, however, rendered his life so uneasy, that he resolved to leave the college and go abroad; which resolution no sooner took air than the Doctor and the Archbishop, knowing his abilities, wrote letters to cause him stay. But he, finding that little trust was to be put in their fair promises, and being weary of teaching philosophy, demitted his charge, took his leave of the Doctor, wishing him well, although he was the cause of his going away, and left the college, to the great grief of his fellow-regents and students, and the people of Glasgow.

Though he had several charges in Scotland presented to him, and an invitation to go to France, yet, the day after he left Glasgow, being invited to go and be minister of Bangor, in the county of Down, in Ireland, he felt bound in spirit to set his face towards a voyage to that country. Although he met with a contrary wind, he had such recourse to God, upon the very first sight of that land, that he was made to exult with joy; and on coming near Bangor, he had a strong impression borne in upon him, that the dean thereof was sick. This he found to be true when he came thither; and being invited to preach there, he did so for three Sabbaths, to the good liking of the people of that parish. The dean, though formerly but a very naughty man, yet told Mr Blair that he was to succeed him in that place; and exhorted him, in the name of Christ, not to leave that good way wherein he had begun to walk, professing much sorrow that he had done so himself. He condemned Episcopacy more strongly than ever Mr Blair durst; and drawing his head towards his bosom, with both his arms, he blessed him; which conduct being so unlike himself, as also his speaking in a strain so different from his usual, made a gentlewoman standing by say, "An angel is speaking out of the dean’s bed to Mr Blair," thinking it could not be such a man. Within a few days he died, and Robert Blair was settled minister there.

His ordination was on this manner. He went to Bishop Knox, and told him his opinions; and said, that a bishop’s sole ordination did contradict his principles. But the Bishop being informed beforehand of his great parts and piety, answered him both wittily and submissively, saying, "Whatever you account of Episcopacy, yet I know you account Presbytery to have a Divine warrant. Will you not receive ordination from Mr Cunningham and the adjacent brethren, and let me come in among them in no other relation than a Presbyter?" for on no lower terms could he be answerable to law. This Mr Blair could not refuse. He was accordingly ordained about the year 1623.

Being thus settled, his charge was very great, having above 1200 persons come to age, besides children, who stood greatly in need of instruction; and in this case he preached twice a week, besides the Lord’s-day; on all which occasions, he found little difficulty either as to matter or method. He became the chief instrument of that great work which appeared shortly thereafter, at Six-mile Water, and other parts in the counties of Down and Antrim; and that not only by his own ministry, wherein he was both diligent and faithful, but also in the great pains he took to stir up others unto the like duty.

While he was at Bangor, there was a man named Constable in the parish, who went to Scotland with horses to sell, and at a fair sold them all to a person who pretended he had not money at present, but gave him a bond till Martinmas. The poor man suspecting nothing, returned home; and one night about that time, going homeward, near Bangor, his merchant (who was supposed to be the devil) met him: "Now (says he), you know my bargain, how I bought you at such a place, and now I am come, as I promised, to pay the price." "Bought me!" said the poor man trembling, "you bought but my horses." "Nay," said the devil, "I will let you know I bought yourself;" and further said, that he must kill somebody, and the more excellent the person, the better it would be for him; and particularly charged him to kill Mr Blair, else he would not free him. The man was so overcome with terror, through the violence of the temptation, that he determined the thing, and went to Mr Blair’s house, with a dagger in his right hand, under his cloak; and though much confounded, was moving to get it out. But on Mr Blair speaking to him, he fell a trembling, and on inquiry declared the whole fact; and withal said, he had laboured to draw out the dagger, but it would not come from the scabbard, though he knew not what hindered it; for when he essayed to draw it forth again, it came out with ease. Mr Blair blessed the Lord, and exhorted him to choose him for his refuge, after which he departed.

Two weeks afterwards, being confined to his bed, Constable sent for Mr Blair, and told him, that the night before, as he was returning home, the devil appeared to him, and challenged him for opening to Mr Blair what passed betwixt them, claiming him as his; and putting the cap off his head, and the band from his neck, said, that on Hallow Evening he should have him soul and body, in spite of the minister and all others. He therefore begged Mr Blair, for Christ’s sake, to be with him against that time. Mr Blair instructed him, prayed with him, and promised to be with him against the appointed time. Afterwards he had much hesitation in his own mind, whether to keep that appointment or not; yet, at last, he took one of his elders with him, and went according to promise, and spent the whole night in prayer, explaining the doctrine of Christ’s temptation, and praising with short intermissions. In the morning they took courage, defying Satan and all his devices. The man seemed very penitent, and died in a little after.

It was during the first year of his ministry, that he resolved not to go through a whole book or chapter of the Bible, but to make choice of some passages which held forth important heads of religion, and to close the course with one sermon of heaven’s glory, and another of hell’s torments; but when he came to meditate on these subjects, he was held a whole day in great perplexity, and could fix upon neither method nor matter till night, when, after sorrowing for his disorder, the Lord, in great pity, brought both matter and method into his mind, which remained with him until he got the same delivered.

About this time he met with a most notable deliverance: for, staying in a high house at the end of the town until the manse should be built, and being late at his studies, the candle was burned out, and having called for another, as the landlady brought it from a room under which he lay, she saw to her astonishment, that a joist under his bed had taken fire. The consequence of this, had he been in bed as usual, in all probability had been dreadful to the whole town, as well as to him, the wind being strong: but, by the timeous alarm given, the danger was prevented, which made him give thanks to God for this great deliverance.

When he first celebrated the Lord’s Supper, his heart was much lifted up in speaking of the New Covenant, which made him, under the view of a second administration of the ordinance, resolve to go back unto that inexhaustible fountain of consolation; and coming over to Scotland about that time, he received no small assistance from David Dickson, who was then restored unto his flock at Irvine, and was studying and preaching on the same subject.

But it was not many years that he could have liberty in the exercise of his office; for, in harvest of 1631, he and John Livingstone were, by Ecklim, Bishop of Down, suspended from their office. Upon recourse to Archbishop Usher, who sent a letter to the Bishop, their sentence was relaxed, and they went on in their ministry until May 1632, when they were, by the said Bishop, deposed from the office of the holy ministry.

After this no redress could be had; whereupon Mr Blair resolved on a journey to Court, to represent their petitions and grievances to King Charles I. On his arrival at London, he could have no access for some time to his Majesty, and so laboured under many difficulties with little hopes of redress; until one day, having gone to Greenwich Park, where, being wearied with waiting on the Court, and while at prayer, the Lord assured him that he would hunt the violent man to destroy him. And while thus in earnest with the Lord for a favourable return, he adventured to propose a sign, that, if the Lord would make the reeds growing hard by (which were moved with the wind, as he was tossed in mind), to cease from shaking, he would take it as an assurance of the despatch of his business. To this the Lord condescended; for, in a little time it became so calm, that not one of them moved; and in a short time he got a despatch to his mind, wherein the King did not only sign his petition, but, with his own hand, wrote on the margin (directed to the depute), "Indulge these men, for they are Scotsmen."

It was while in England that he had, from Ezekiel 24:16, a strange discovery of his wife’s death, and the very bed whereon she was lying, and the particular acquaintances attending her; and although she was in good health at his return home, yet in a little all this exactly came to pass.

After Blair’s return, the King’s letter being slighted by the depute, who was newly returned from England, he was forced to have recourse to Archbishop Usher, who wept that he could not help them. By the interposition of Lord Castlestuart with the King, they got six months’ liberty. But upon the back of this, in November 1634, he was again summoned before the Bishop, and the sentence of excommunication pronounced against him by Ecklim, Bishop of Down. After the sentence was pronounced, Mr Blair rose up and publicly cited the Bishop to appear before the tribunal of Jesus Christ, to answer for that wicked deed. Whereupon he did appeal from the justice of God to his mercy; but Mr Blair replied: "Your appeal is like to be rejected, because you act against the light of your own conscience." In a few months after, the Bishop fell sick; and the physician inquiring of his sickness, after some time’s silence, he, with great difficulty, said: "It is my conscience, man." To which the doctor replied: "I have no cure for that;" and in a little after he died.

After Mr Blair’s ejection, he preached often in his own, and in other houses, until the beginning of the year 1635, when he began to think of marriage with Catherine Montgomery, daughter to Hugh Montgomery, formerly of Busby in Ayrshire (then residing in Ireland). For this he came over to Scotland with his own and his wife’s friends, and upon his return to Ireland, they were married in the month of May following.

Matters still continuing the same, he engaged with the rest of the ejected ministers in their resolution of building a ship, called the "Eaglewings," of about 115 tons, on purpose to go to New England. But about 300 or 400 leagues from Ireland, meeting with a terrible hurricane, they were forced back unto Carrickfergus, the same harbour from which they loosed; the Lord having work for them elsewhere, it was fit their purpose should be defeated. He continued four months after this in Ireland, until, upon information that he and Mr Livingstone were to be apprehended, they immediately went out of the way, took shipping, and landed in Scotland in the year 1637.

All that summer after Mr Blair’s arrival, he was as much employed in public and private exercises as before, mostly at Irvine and the country around, and partly at Edinburgh. But things being then in a confusion, because the service-book was then urged upon the ministers, his old inclination to go to France revived; and upon an invitation to be chaplain of Colonel Hepburn’s regiment (newly enlisted in Scotland for the French service), he embarked with them at Leith. Some of these recruits, who were mostly Highlanders, being desperately wicked, and threatening upon his reproofs to stab him, he resolved to quit that voyage. Calling to the shipmaster to set him on shore, without imparting his design, a boat was immediately ordered for his service; at which time he met with another deliverance, for, his foot sliding, he was in danger of going to the bottom; but the Lord so ordered, that he got hold of a rope, by which he hung till he was relieved.

Robert Blair’s return gave great satisfaction to his friends at Edinburgh, and the Second Reformation being then in the ascendant, he got a call to be colleague to Mr Annan, at Ayr, in the spring of 1638; and upon May 2, at a meeting of the Presbytery, having preached from 2 Cor. 4:5, he was, at the special desire of all the people thereof, admitted a minister. He stayed not long here; for having, before the General Assembly held at Glasgow in 1638, fully vindicated himself, both anent his affair with Dr Cameron while regent in the University, and his settlement in Ireland, he was, for his great parts and known abilities, ordered to be translated to St Andrews. But the Assembly’s motives in this did prove his detriment for some time, and the burgh of Ayr, where the Lord had begun to bless his labours, had the favour for another year. But the Assembly held at Edinburgh, 1639, being offended at his disobeying, ordered him peremptorily to remove to St Andrews.

In the year 1640, when King Charles I., by the advice of the clergy, had caused burn the articles of the former treaty with the Scots, and again prepared to chastise them with a royal army, the Scots, resolving not always to play after-game, also raised an army, invaded England, routed about 4000 English at Newburn, had Newcastle surrendered to them, and within two days were masters of Durham. This produced a new treaty, more favourable to them than the former. With this army was Mr Blair, who went with Lord Lindsay’s regiment; and when the treaty was on foot, the Committee of Estates and the army sent him up to assist the commissioners with his best advice.

Again, after the rebellion in Ireland, 1641, those who survived the storm supplicated the General Assembly, in the year 1642, for a supply of ministers, when several went over, and among the first Mr Blair. During his stay there, he generally preached once every day, and twice on Sabbath, and frequently in the field, the auditories being so large; and in some of these he also administered the Lord’s Supper.

After his return the condition of the Church and State was various during the years 1643 and 1644. In August 1643, the Committee of the General Assembly, whereof Mr Blair was one, with John, Earl of Rutland, and other four Commissioners from the Parliament of England, and Messrs Stephen Marshall, and Philip Nye, ministers, agreed to a solemn league and covenant betwixt the two kingdoms of Scotland and England. And in the end of the same year, when the Scots assisted the English Parliament, Mr Blair was by the Commission of the General Assembly appointed minister to the Earl of Crawford’s regiment; with which he stayed until the King was routed at Marston Moor, July 1644, when he returned to his charge at St Andrews.

The Parliament and Commission of the Kirk sat at Perth in July 1645. The Parliament was opened with a sermon by Robert Blair; and, after he had, upon the forenoon of the 27th (a day of solemn humiliation), preached again to the Parliament, he rode out to the army, then encamped at Forgandenny, and preached to Crawford’s and Maitland’s regiments, to the first of which he had been chaplain. He told the brigade that he was informed many of them were turned dissolute and profane; and assured them, that though the Lord had covered their heads in the day of battle (few of them being killed at Marston Moor), they should not be able to stand before a less formidable foe, unless they repented. Though this freedom was taken in good part from one who wished them well, yet was it too little laid to heart; and the most part of Crawford’s regiment was cut off at Kilsyth, in three weeks afterwards. After the defeat at Kilsyth, several were for treating with the Marquis of Montrose, but Mr Blair opposed it; so that nothing was concluded until the Lord began to look upon the affliction of His people. For the Committee of Estates recalled General David Leslie, with 4000 foot and 1000 dragoons, from England; to oppose whom, Montrose marched southward, but was shamefully defeated at Philiphaugh, September 13, many of his forces being killed and taken prisoners, and he himself hardly escaping.

On the 26th, the Parliament and Commission of the General Assembly sat down at St Andrews (the plague being then in Edinburgh). Here Mr Blair preached before the Parliament, and also prayed before several sessions thereof; and when several prisoners, taken at Philiphaugh, were tried; and three of them, viz., Sir Robert Spottiswoode, Messrs Nathaniel Gordon and Andrew Guthrie, were condemned to be executed on the 17th of January thereafter: Mr Blair visited them often, and was at much pains with t

The 5th july 1650 was a notable day as King Charles 11 visited the "Merchant's House" to pay his respects to the Rev. & Mrs Blair. On being offered a chair by Mrs Blair the minister was stated as saying "Do not trouble yourself he is a young man he can draw one for himself". The "Merchant's House" has always been known for it`s superb hospitality and to this day it is our aim to maintain and enhance the experience. It is reputed that the Rev Blair still walks the streets of St. Andrews.

 

More About Robert Blair:

Burial: grave is at Aberdour, Scotland

 

628. Ephraim Tinkham, born Jan 06, 1615/16 in Ashburton, Devon, England; died Oct 10, 1685 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass. He was the son of 1256. John Tinkecomb. He married 629. Mary Brown.

629. Mary Brown

Child of Ephraim Tinkham and Mary Brown is:

314 i. Helkiah Tinkham, born Feb 08, 1654/55 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass; married Ruth Cooke.

 

702. Comte Gallois

Child of Comte Gallois is:

351 i. Marie Louise Gallois, born 1702 in Mannheim Germany; married Charles Estienne Houdelette.

 

928. Thomas Laughton He was the son of 1856. Thomas Loughton and 1857. Elizabeth Franklin. He married 929. Sarah Lenthall.

929. Sarah Lenthall

Child of Thomas Laughton and Sarah Lenthall is:

464 i. Samuel Laughton, born Abt. 1658; died Mar 10, 1729/30; married Sarah Graves.

 

930. Thomas Graves He married 931. Hannah.

931. Hannah

Child of Thomas Graves and Hannah is:

465 i. Sarah Graves, married Samuel Laughton.

 

936. Dolor Davis, died Jun 1673 in Barnstable, Mass. He married 937. Margery Willard Mar 29, 1624 in East Farleigh, Kent, England.

937. Margery Willard, born Nov 07, 1602 in Horsemonden, Kent, ENGland; died 1658. She was the daughter of 1874. Richard Willard and 1875. Margery Humphrey.

Notes for Dolor Davis:

[Master Tree.FTW]

"Perhaps of all the families which came to New England, not one can be selected more worthy of our esteem, and unqualified approbation than that of Dolor Davis. As a man he was honest, industrious and prudent; as a christian tolerant and exact in the performance of his religious duties; as a neighbor kind, obliging, and ever ready to help those who needed his assistance; and as a father and the head of his family he was constantly solicitous for the welfare of all its members, cultivating those kindly feelings and amenities of life which render home delightful." (Amos Otis, in Barnstable Families.)

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

"Perhaps of all the families which came to New England, not one can be selected more worthy of our esteem, and unqualified approbation than that of Dolor Davis. As a man he was honest, industrious and prudent; as a christian tolerant and exact in the performance of his religious duties; as a neighbor kind, obliging, and ever ready to help those who needed his assistance; and as a father and the head of his family he was constantly solicitous for the welfare of all its members, cultivating those kindly feelings and amenities of life which render home delightful." (Amos Otis, in Barnstable Families.)

 

More About Dolor Davis:

Comment 1: Was Secretary to the first colonial Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony

Immigration: 1634, arrived in Cambridge, Middlesex Co., MA

Occupation: Master Builder

More About Margery Willard:

Baptism: Nov 06, 1602, Horsemonden, Kent, ENG

Event: Jul 17, 1658, signed a deed for the sale of land at Barnstable, MA

Children of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard are:

468 i. Lieut. Simon Davis, born 1635 in Cambridge, MA; died Jun 14, 1713 in Concord, MA; married Mary Blood Dec 12, 1660 in Concord, MA.

ii. Mary Davis, married Thomas Lewis Jun 15, 1653 in Falmouth, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts; born Jan 05, 1629/30 in East Greenwich, Kent Co., England; died Apr 26, 1709 in Bristol, Bristol County, Rhode Island.

More About Mary Davis:

Christening: 1634, Massachusetts

More About Thomas Lewis:

Burial: 1709, Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts

 

938. James Blood, born Abt. 1580 in Ruddington, Nottinghamshire, England/Ruddington, England; died Dec 17, 1683 in Concord, Middlesex, MA. He was the son of 1876. Thomas Blood. He married 939. Eleanor Harrison 1630 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England.

939. Eleanor Harrison, born WFT Est. 1595-1618 in England; died Aug 01, 1674 in Concord, Middlesex, MA. She was the daughter of 1878. Edward Harrison.

Notes for James Blood:

The Bloods were among the original proprieters of Groton, Massachusetts. James Blood came to Concord in 1639, is said to have been a brother of Colonel John Blood known in English history for his designs on Charles II. He had a great estate.

 

 

More About James Blood:

Emigration: 1638, Cheshire Entland to New England then to Concord, Mass

Event: 1641, Freeman

Children of James Blood and Eleanor Harrison are:

i. Richard Blood, born Abt. 1617 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England; died Oct 07, 1683 in Groton, Middlesex, MA; married Isabell Wilkinson Nov 25, 1642 in Groton, Middlesex, MA; born WFT Est. 1625-1660; died WFT Est. 1659-1741.

Notes for Richard Blood:

[Master Tree.FTW]

Richard BLOOD was born in Ruddington, Nottingham, England in 1617. He is found in New England in 1642 when his wife Isabel, is named in the will of Henry WILKINSON. Isabel is listed as a cousin of Henry. "Story of the Bloods", by Roger Deane Harris, page 164-165 , "Geneology Dictionary of the First Families of New England" by James Savage", page 208 and "Geneological Gleanings in England" by Waters, page not given.

According to the Archives of the Salt Lake City Library, Richard married Isabel/Isobel 25 November 1642, place not given. Another sources states that Richard and Isobel were married in 1642 in Groton, Massachusetts. They had a daughter in June of 1648, born in Lynn, Massachusetts. (Salt Lake City Library-Archives) "New England Marriages Prior to 1700" by Clarence Almon Torrey and (Vital Records of Births in Lynn, Massachusetts), page 54.

Richard and Isabel lived in Lynn, Massachusetts until about 1657. He probably worked at the first iron foundery in the colonies. He also served as a Constable of Lynn in 1657. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, page 6.

After moving to Groton, Richard was chief of the original proprietors and was granted sixty acres of land. The other land grants were for twenty or fifty acres. Richard was one of the signers of the petition to have Groton become a town. "Bicentennial for Silas Blood 1775-1976" by Marion B. Lawrence, page 43.

In 1668, Richard BLOOD and several others, were chosen as overseers of the highways. He was also Town Clerk and sat on the Board of Selectmen in 1669. In some of the records, Richard's surname is spelled as BLUD and as BLOUD "Early Records of Groton, Massachusetts" by Samuel A. Green, page 24-25 & 57 and (Groton Vital Records) page 204.

War broke out with the Indians and in 1675, during King Phillips War, the town of Groton was attacked. Richard and his family, along with many others inhabitants, fled to Concord, Massachusetts and stayed there until the fighting was over. Groton was resettled by 1678 and Richard returned with the others. There were many clashes with the Indians and James BLOOD, Richard's son was killed at Groton 13 September 1692. Three of Richard's grandchildren were captured by the Indians on 20 June 1707 and taken to Canada. Sarah TARBELL was placed in a Convent. Her brothers, John and Zechariah became Chiefs of the Coughnawaga Tribe. They were among the founders of St. Regis and in 1883 still had descendants living there. "Groton During the Indian Wars 1655-1790" by Samuel A. Green, page 106 & 124, and "Memorials of the Descendants of William Shattuck" by Lemuel Shadduck, page 369.

Richard passed away 7 December 1683 in Groton, Massachusetts. He had deeded land to his sons shortly before his death. Administration of his estate was granted to his widow and his three sons, James, Joseph, and Nathaniel on 1 April 1684. His widow, Isabel gave bond on 8 July 1684 with Joseph PARKER and Zachariah FERRIS as surities. She had moved in with her daughter, Hannah and Hannah's husband, Joseph Parker, Jr. in Groton after Richard's death. It is not known when Isabel died. Her son-in-law, Joseph PARKER, petitioned to sell her land in 1705. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, pages 164-166 and (Court Records of Middlesex County, Quarterly Court)

Some researchers have Richard BLOOD listed as a brother of Robert BLOOD with their Father being James BLOOD. James was born about 1600 and would have only been seventeen years old and unmarried when Richard was born in 1617. James was married in St. Peter's Church in the city of Nottingham on 7 February 1630/31 to Ellen HARRISON. Richard and Robert lived in the same area and may have been brothers or cousins. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, page 1.

Richard and Isabel had seven known children and their descendants are scattered from Massachusetts to California and from Canada to Florida. I'm pleased to know that I descend from people who had the imagination and fortitude to leave the security of their homeland and take a chance on finding a better life.

Submitted by Jacqueline Boland Arnold of Melbourne, Florida.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Richard BLOOD was born in Ruddington, Nottingham, England in 1617. He is found in New England in 1642 when his wife Isabel, is named in the will of Henry WILKINSON. Isabel is listed as a cousin of Henry. "Story of the Bloods", by Roger Deane Harris, page 164-165 , "Geneology Dictionary of the First Families of New England" by James Savage", page 208 and "Geneological Gleanings in England" by Waters, page not given.

According to the Archives of the Salt Lake City Library, Richard married Isabel/Isobel 25 November 1642, place not given. Another sources states that Richard and Isobel were married in 1642 in Groton, Massachusetts. They had a daughter in June of 1648, born in Lynn, Massachusetts. (Salt Lake City Library-Archives) "New England Marriages Prior to 1700" by Clarence Almon Torrey and (Vital Records of Births in Lynn, Massachusetts), page 54.

Richard and Isabel lived in Lynn, Massachusetts until about 1657. He probably worked at the first iron foundery in the colonies. He also served as a Constable of Lynn in 1657. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, page 6.

After moving to Groton, Richard was chief of the original proprietors and was granted sixty acres of land. The other land grants were for twenty or fifty acres. Richard was one of the signers of the petition to have Groton become a town. "Bicentennial for Silas Blood 1775-1976" by Marion B. Lawrence, page 43.

In 1668, Richard BLOOD and several others, were chosen as overseers of the highways. He was also Town Clerk and sat on the Board of Selectmen in 1669. In some of the records, Richard's surname is spelled as BLUD and as BLOUD "Early Records of Groton, Massachusetts" by Samuel A. Green, page 24-25 & 57 and (Groton Vital Records) page 204.

War broke out with the Indians and in 1675, during King Phillips War, the town of Groton was attacked. Richard and his family, along with many others inhabitants, fled to Concord, Massachusetts and stayed there until the fighting was over. Groton was resettled by 1678 and Richard returned with the others. There were many clashes with the Indians and James BLOOD, Richard's son was killed at Groton 13 September 1692. Three of Richard's grandchildren were captured by the Indians on 20 June 1707 and taken to Canada. Sarah TARBELL was placed in a Convent. Her brothers, John and Zechariah became Chiefs of the Coughnawaga Tribe. They were among the founders of St. Regis and in 1883 still had descendants living there. "Groton During the Indian Wars 1655-1790" by Samuel A. Green, page 106 & 124, and "Memorials of the Descendants of William Shattuck" by Lemuel Shadduck, page 369.

Richard passed away 7 December 1683 in Groton, Massachusetts. He had deeded land to his sons shortly before his death. Administration of his estate was granted to his widow and his three sons, James, Joseph, and Nathaniel on 1 April 1684. His widow, Isabel gave bond on 8 July 1684 with Joseph PARKER and Zachariah FERRIS as surities. She had moved in with her daughter, Hannah and Hannah's husband, Joseph Parker, Jr. in Groton after Richard's death. It is not known when Isabel died. Her son-in-law, Joseph PARKER, petitioned to sell her land in 1705. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, pages 164-166 and (Court Records of Middlesex County, Quarterly Court)

Some researchers have Richard BLOOD listed as a brother of Robert BLOOD with their Father being James BLOOD. James was born about 1600 and would have only been seventeen years old and unmarried when Richard was born in 1617. James was married in St. Peter's Church in the city of Nottingham on 7 February 1630/31 to Ellen HARRISON. Richard and Robert lived in the same area and may have been brothers or cousins. "Story of the Bloods" by Roger Deane Harris, page 1.

Richard and Isabel had seven known children and their descendants are scattered from Massachusetts to California and from Canada to Florida. I'm pleased to know that I descend from people who had the imagination and fortitude to leave the security of their homeland and take a chance on finding a better life.

Submitted by Jacqueline Boland Arnold of Melbourne, Florida.

 

 

More About Richard Blood:

Comment 1: killed by Indians

ii. Robert Blood, born Abt. 1628 in England; died Oct 27, 1701 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; married (1) Elizabeth Willard Apr 18, 1653 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; born WFT Est. 1609-1636; died Aug 29, 1690; married (2) Hannah Parker Jan 06, 1689/90; married (3) Hannah Jenkins Jan 08, 1695/96; born WFT Est. 1652-1679; died WFT Est. 1701-1769.

iii. John Blood, born Abt. 1630 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England; died Oct 30, 1692 in Concord, MA.

Notes for John Blood:

John Blood, unmarried, found dead in the woods with his gun in his hand, Oct 30, 1692. He and his brother Robert sold a cottage in Puddington, Nottingham County, England in 1649, when they were living in Concord. They owned over two thousand acres of land, including the Blood Farms, which fell to Robert's children

iv. James Blood, born Abt. 1632 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England; died Nov 26, 1692 in Groton, Middlesex, MA; married (1) Hannah Purchis Oct 26, 1657; born WFT Est. 1613-1640; died WFT Est. 1662-1730; married (2) Isabel Farmer Nov 19, 1679; born WFT Est. 1635-1662; died WFT Est. 1684-1752.

Notes for James Blood:

Lived where Rev. Dr. Ripley now lives (1835); a deacon in the church; died Nov 26, 1692; she d. 1677, left an only child, Sarah Blood who married William Wilson.

 

469 v. Mary Blood, born Jul 12, 1640 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; died WFT Est. 1681-1735; married (1) Jonathan Whitcomb; married (2) Lieut. Simon Davis Dec 12, 1660 in Concord, MA.

 

940. John Smedley, died 1695. He married 941. Ann Walden Nov 29, 1638.

941. Ann Walden

Child of John Smedley and Ann Walden is:

470 i. John Smedley, born Aug 31, 1646 in Concord, Mass; died Feb 06, 1716/17 in Concord, Mass; married Sarah Wheeler May 05, 1669.

 

942. Thomas Wheeler, born Abt. 1620; died Dec 24, 1704. He married 943. Sarah Merian.

943. Sarah Merian, died Feb 01, 1675/76. She was the daughter of 1886. George Merian and 1887. Susannah.

Child of Thomas Wheeler and Sarah Merian is:

471 i. Sarah Wheeler, born in Concord, Mass; married John Smedley May 05, 1669.

 

944. Samual Howland, born 1638 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; died May 07, 1716 in Freetown, Bristol, Mass. He was the son of 1888. Henry Howland and 1889. Mary Newland. He married 945. Mary Sampson.

945. Mary Sampson She was the daughter of 1890. Abraham Sampson and 1891. Esther Nash.

Child of Samual Howland and Mary Sampson is:

472 i. Abraham Howland, born May 09, 1675 in Freetown, Bristol, Mass; died Jun 15, 1747 in Hanson, Mass; married Ann Rouse.

 

952. John Cushing, born 1627; died Mar 31, 1708. He was the son of 1904. Matthew Cushing and 1905. Nazareth Pitcher. He married 953. Sarah Hawke 1658.

953. Sarah Hawke, born Aug 01, 1641; died WFT Est. 1663-1730. She was the daughter of 1906. Matthew Hawke and 1907. Margaret Nelson.

Notes for John Cushing:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

In 1658, he, together with Mattias Briggs, his brother-in-law, purchased for 120 pounds the Varsdal estate at "Belle House Neck", Scituate, which consisted of 120 acres, with house and barns. He did not move there, however, until 1662, staying in Hingham until after his father's death. The name 'Belle House Neck" was given to the place in consquence of a bell that hung at the house in case of the approach of Indians.

In 1663, he was Surveyor of Highways, in 1667, Receiver of Excises, in 1673, on Committee to divide Scituate lands; in 1674 Deputy for the Colony, and often re-elected; in 1676, reported to the government a statement of the services of the Scituate soldiers in King Phillip's war; in 1674-86, Selectman; in 1685-92, County Magistrate of Plymouth Co.; in 1689-91, was Assisstant to the Old Colony Government; in 1692, Representative to the General Court, Boston, and for several succeeding years; in 1706-07, Member of the Council. He was also Colonel of the Plymouth Regiment. [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

In 1658, he, together with Mattias Briggs, his brother-in-law, purchased for 120 pounds the Varsdal estate at "Belle House Neck", Scituate, which consisted of 120 acres, with house and barns. He did not move there, however, until 1662, staying in Hingham until after his father's death. The name 'Belle House Neck" was given to the place in consquence of a bell that hung at the house in case of the approach of Indians.

In 1663, he was Surveyor of Highways, in 1667, Receiver of Excises, in 1673, on Committee to divide Scituate lands; in 1674 Deputy for the Colony, and often re-elected; in 1676, reported to the government a statement of the services of the Scituate soldiers in King Phillip's war; in 1674-86, Selectman; in 1685-92, County Magistrate of Plymouth Co.; in 1689-91, was Assisstant to the Old Colony Government; in 1692, Representative to the General Court, Boston, and for several succeeding years; in 1706-07, Member of the Council. He was also Colonel of the Plymouth Regiment.

More About John Cushing:

Fact 1: See notes

Children of John Cushing and Sarah Hawke are:

476 i. James M Cushing, married Mary Barrell Dec 10, 1713.

ii. John Cushing II, born Apr 28, 1662; died WFT Est. 1683-1752; married WFT Est. 1681-1713.

More About John Cushing II:

Event 1: 1702, Chief Justice of Superior Court of Plymouh

Event 2: 1710, Councillor of Mass.

Event 3: 1728, Judge -37

iii. Caleb Cushing, born 1772; died WFT Est. 1803-1862; married Rev Jno. Cotton'S Daughter Cotton WFT Est. 1803-1837; born WFT Est. 1768-1788; died WFT Est. 1803-1872.

 

954. William Barrrell He was the son of 1908. William Barrell and 1909. <Unnamed>. He married 955. Lydia.

955. Lydia

Child of William Barrrell and Lydia is:

477 i. Mary Barrell, born Sep 10, 1686; married James M Cushing Dec 10, 1713.

 

956. Joseph Souther, born Aug 20, 1658 in Boston, Mass; died Jan 02, 1695/96 in Boston, Mass. He was the son of 1912. Joseph (Souther) Sowther.

Child of Joseph Souther is:

478 i. Joseph Souther, born Feb 27, 1684/85 in Boston, Massachusetts; died Jul 22, 1740 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married Content Tower Apr 22, 1708.

 

958. Ibrook Tower, born Feb 07, 1643/44 in Hingham, Massachusetts; died Nov 21, 1731. He was the son of 1916. John Tower and 1917. Margaret Ibrook. He married 959. Margaret Harding Apr 24, 1668.

959. Margaret Harding, born 1647; died Nov 19, 1705. She was the daughter of 1918. John Hardin and 1919. Eunice Benson.

Children of Ibrook Tower and Margaret Harding are:

i. Richard Tower, born Jul 20, 1669; married Abigail Farrow Abt. 1692 in Hingham, Plymouth Co., Massachusetts.

479 ii. Content Tower, born Jan 13, 1682/83; died Dec 18, 1730; married Joseph Souther Apr 22, 1708.

iii. Rachel Tower, born Mar 16, 1673/74; married Joshua Bates Jan 15, 1694/95.

iv. Daniel Tower, born Jun 13, 1671; died 1690.

Notes for Daniel Tower:

Died in the Canada Expedition under Sir William Phips.

v. John Tower, born Mar 21, 1672/73; died Dec 09, 1711 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married Hester Canterbury Jan 15, 1695/96.

vi. Mary Tower, born Aug 16, 1677.

vii. Patience Tower, born Mar 21, 1677/78.

viii. Hezekiah Tower, born Oct 09, 1681.

ix. Elizabeth Tower, born Jun 09, 1682.

x. Nehemiah Tower, born Nov 04, 1685.

xi. Lydia Tower, born Nov 25, 1692.

xii. Daniel Tower

 

960. John Hibbert, born Nov 24, 1642 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died Mar 27, 1718 in Salem, Massachusetts. He was the son of 1920. Robert Hibbert and 1921. Joanna Luff. He married 961. Ruth Walden Sep 16, 1679.

961. Ruth Walden, born 1659 in Wendham, Mass; died Abt. 1701. She was the daughter of 1922. Edward Walden and 1909. <Unnamed>.

Notes for John Hibbert:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Hibbert.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0283, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

GENOALOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine George Hibbard, 1901, p. 16

A deed of land to John Cleaves, of Beverly, dated August 27, 1709, mentions his son Zaccheus and is signed by John and "Lidia Hebbard." Another deed dated November 4, 1713, reads: "I, John Hebbert sen , of Beverly, yoeman and carpenter, from love and affection to my son Zacheas Hebbert give all my Real and personal estate," etc. This fact accounts for there being no administrator of his estate.[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Hibbert.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0283, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

GENOALOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine George Hibbard, 1901, p. 16

A deed of land to John Cleaves, of Beverly, dated August 27, 1709, mentions his son Zaccheus and is signed by John and "Lidia Hebbard." Another deed dated November 4, 1713, reads: "I, John Hebbert sen , of Beverly, yoeman and carpenter, from love and affection to my son Zacheas Hebbert give all my Real and personal estate," etc. This fact accounts for there being no administrator of his estate.

More About John Hibbert:

Christening: May 17, 1646, First Church Of Salem, Massachusetts

Occupation: Yoeman and carpenter

Children of John Hibbert and Ruth Walden are:

480 i. John Hibbert, born Jun 04, 1682 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died May 03, 1752 in Metheun, Massachusetts; married Dorothy Graves Jun 06, 1708 in Beverly, Massachusetts.

ii. Ruth Hibbert

iii. Elizabeth Hibbert

iv. Martha Hibbert

 

962. Capt. Ebenezer Graves, born Nov 20, 1666 in Hatfield, Massachusetts; died WFT Est. 1667-1756. He was the son of 1924. John Graves and 1925. Mary Smith. He married 473. Ann Rouse.

473. Ann Rouse

Child of Ebenezer Graves and Ann Rouse is:

481 i. Dorothy Graves, born Jul 21, 1684 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died Aug 16, 1766 in Metheun, Massachusetts; married John Hibbert Jun 06, 1708 in Beverly, Massachusetts.

 

968. Phillip Eastman, born Oct 20, 1644 in Salisbury, Massachusetts; died Bef. 1714. He was the son of 1936. Roger Eastman and 1937. Sarah Smith. He married 969. Mary (Barnard) Morse Aug 22, 1678.

969. Mary (Barnard) Morse She was the daughter of 1938. Thomas Barnard and 1939. Elenor.

Child of Phillip Eastman and Mary Morse is:

484 i. Ebenezer Eastman, born Bet. Feb 17, 1680/81 - Jan 10, 1686/87 in Haverhill, Massachusetts; died Jul 23, 1748; married Sarah Peaslee Mar 04, 1709/10.

 

970. Joseph Peaslee, born Sep 09, 1646; died Mar 21, 1733/34 in Haverhill, Esses, MA. He was the son of 1940. Joseph Peaslee and 1941. Mary Johnson. He married 971. Ruth Barnard Jan 21, 1670/71 in Amesbury, Or Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts.

971. Ruth Barnard, born Oct 16, 1651; died Nov 05, 1723. She was the daughter of 1938. Thomas Barnard and 1939. Elenor.

Notes for Joseph Peaslee:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!BIRTH: (1)

NAME:(2)

MARRIAGE: (2)

!SOURCES:(1) Old Families of Salisbury & Amesbury by David W. Hoyt, 1897

(2) Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pilsbury & john sargent Pillsbury by

Mary Lovering Holman, 1938

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!BIRTH: (1)

NAME:(2)

MARRIAGE: (2)

!SOURCES:(1) Old Families of Salisbury & Amesbury by David W. Hoyt, 1897

(2) Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pilsbury & john sargent Pillsbury by

Mary Lovering Holman, 1938

 

Notes for Ruth Barnard:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!BIRTH: (1) (2)

MARRIAGE:(2)

DEATH: (2)

!SOURCES:(1) Old Families of Salisbury & Amesbury by David W. Hoyt, 1897

(2) Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pilsbury & john sargent Pillsbury by

Mary Lovering Holman, 1938

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!BIRTH: (1) (2)

MARRIAGE:(2)

DEATH: (2)

!SOURCES:(1) Old Families of Salisbury & Amesbury by David W. Hoyt, 1897

(2) Ancestry of Charles Stinson Pilsbury & john sargent Pillsbury by

Mary Lovering Holman, 1938

Children of Joseph Peaslee and Ruth Barnard are:

490 i. John Peaslee, married Mary Martin May 01, 1705.

485 ii. Sarah Peaslee, born Aug 15, 1690; married Ebenezer Eastman Mar 04, 1709/10.

 

976. John Morrill, born 1640 in Kittery, York, ME; died 1723. He was the son of 1952. Richard Morrill. He married 977. Sarah Hodson 1667.

977. Sarah Hodson, born 1650. She was the daughter of 1954. Nicholas Hodson and 1955. Elizabeth Needham.

Notes for John Morrill:

In Morrill Kindred, Annie Morrill Smith states that Ethel Morrill McCollister held the belief that John Morrell of Kittery was a nephew of the two brothers Abraham and Isaac. DNA testing, however, has conclusively ruled this out. His parents and place of birth are unknown, though Mrs. McCollister suggests his father was Richard Morrell, who was in Portsmouth N.H. in 1640, brother of Nicholas Morrell, mariner. Lois Fooshee Williamson states that her family tradition is that this family comes from North Riding of Yorkshire, England. John Morrell first turns up in the written record in 1663, occupation "plasterer." He was a "Friend," or Quaker, as were many of his descendents.

John Morrell is found in Ipswitch, Massachusetts, in 1661, about four years before his marriage in Kittery. "Acting under this law [for avoiding inconveniences referring to the settlement of poor people], the Selectmen made complaint to the Ipswitch Court in March 1661, that they had notified Daniel Grazier and John Morrill, Irishmen, that they were not willing to have them as inhabitants and they had not removed." We don't know of any other John Morrell in New England at this time, the only other family of this surname is Abraham Morrill of Kittery, so its highly likely that this is our John Morrell of Kittery. In addition, 1661 aligns well with the first mention of John in Kittery, which was in 1663, occupation "plasterer." This is the first clue we have as to the nationality of John Morrell, as it seems he has come from Ireland. In addition, it appears his Atlantic crossing may have brought him first to Massachusetts. [3]

 

Child of John Morrill and Sarah Hodson is:

488 i. John Morrill, born 1675 in Old Kittery, York, ME; died 1763 in North Berwick, York, Maine; married Hannah Dixon Dec 16, 1701 in Kittery, York, ME.

 

978. Peter Dixon He married 979. Mary Remick Abt. 1678.

979. Mary Remick, born Aug 07, 1658 in Kittery, Maine; died Aft. 1708. She was the daughter of 1958. Christian Remick and 1959. Hannah Foster.

Child of Peter Dixon and Mary Remick is:

489 i. Hannah Dixon, born Feb 03, 1683/84 in Kittery, York, Maine; died Dec 20, 1765 in North Berwick York Maine; married John Morrill Dec 16, 1701 in Kittery, York, ME.

 

Generation No. 11

1256. John Tinkecomb, born 1590 in Devonshire, England; died Dec 17, 1629 in Devonshire, England. He was the son of 2512. Roberte Tinkecomb.

Child of John Tinkecomb is:

628 i. Ephraim Tinkham, born Jan 06, 1615/16 in Ashburton, Devon, England; died Oct 10, 1685 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass; married Mary Brown.

 

1856. Thomas Loughton He was the son of 3712. Richard Laughton. He married 1857. Elizabeth Franklin.

1857. Elizabeth Franklin

Child of Thomas Loughton and Elizabeth Franklin is:

928 i. Thomas Laughton, married Sarah Lenthall.

 

1874. Richard Willard, born Mar 10, 1580/81 in Horsemonden, Kent, England; died Feb 18, 1615/16 in Horsemonden, Kent, England. He was the son of 3748. Symon Willard and 3749. Elizabeth Rode. He married 1875. Margery Humphrey Abt. 1597 in Horsmonden, Kent, England.

1875. Margery Humphrey, born WFT Est. 1559-1583; died WFT Est. 1607-1672. She was the daughter of 3750. Raynold Humphrie.

More About Richard Willard:

Burial: Feb 20, 1616/17, Horsemonden, Kent, England

Will: Mar 08, 1616/17, before Edward POPE, Vicar General. The will names, in order, his wife Joan, her son Francis MOREBREAD

More About Margery Humphrey:

Burial: Dec 12, 1608, Horsemonden, Kent, England

Children of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrey are:

937 i. Margery Willard, born Nov 07, 1602 in Horsemonden, Kent, ENGland; died 1658; married Dolor Davis Mar 29, 1624 in East Farleigh, Kent, England.

ii. Major Simon Willard, born Bef. Apr 07, 1605 in Horsemonden, Kent, England; died Apr 24, 1676; married (1) Mary Sharpe; married (2) Elizabeth Dunster; married (3) Mary Dunster.

Notes for Major Simon Willard:

[Master Tree.FTW]

Simon Willard, Major - Immigrated to America 1634 (29 y.o) - Founder of Concord 4/7/1605 - 5/5/1676 Born in Horsmonden, Kent, England, married Mary Sharp, Mary Dunster, and Elizabeth Dunster. He had 17 children Son of Richard and Margery Willard, colonist, fur trader. He was baptized at Horsemonden, Kent, England, on April 7, 1605. Emigrating to Massachusetts in 1634, he joined with Peter Bulkey and others to establish the town of Concord. From this time until his death, he was one of the leading men on the Merrimac frontier. At Concord he served as local magistrate and commanded the militia company. He represented Concord in the General Court off and on from 1643 to 1654 he was chosen assistant and served until his death. In 1653 he was made sergeant-major of the Middlesex regiment. His activities, both public and private, were closely associated with the Indian trade and the affairs of the frontier settlements. In 1641 he was appointed chief of a committee to carry on and regulate the fur trade, and in 1657 he and three associates farmed the trade of the Merrimac for 25 pounds. In 1646 and afterward he assisted John Eliot in his work among the Merrimac tribes. He was extensively employed by the General Court in Indian affairs, in locating and laying out land grants, in settling the bounds and regulating the affairs of the frontier towns. In 1659 he sold a large part of his Concord estate and removed to Lancaster, Massachusetts. About 1671 he went to live in the southern part of Groton, now Ayer. In 1654 he was appointed to command a punitive expedition against the Niantic sachem, Ninigret. On approach of the English, Ninigret fled into a swamp, and the expedition ended in a parley. Disappointed at the inconclusive outcome, the commissioners of the United Colonies reproved Willard for failure to carry out their instructions. At the outbreak of King Philip's War, in spite of his advanced age, he took charge of the defense of the Merrimac frontier. His most conspicuous service was the relief of Brookfield on August 4, 1675. Ordered thence to the Connecticut Valley, he soon returned to Groton to defend the frontier towns from Chelmsford to Lancaster against the Indians gathered at Mount Wachusett. His duties included the placing of garrisons, the patroling of the frontier with a party of dragoons, and the relief of threatened settlements. Called away from his duties as magistrate, he was absent when the Indians destroyed Groton in March 1676, but he arrived with a relieving force in time to assist in removing the inhabitants. His own house was destroyed and his family forced to remove to Charlestown, thereafter, further service on the frontier, he died, "a pious, orthodox man," according to John Hull (diary in ARCHAELOGIA AMERICANA: TRANS. AND COLLS. AM. ANTIQ. SOC., VOL III 1857, P. 241). He was married three times, first in England to Mary Sharpe, second to Elizabeth, the sister of Henry Dunster, and third to Mary Dunster, either his second wife's sister or cousin. He had seventeen children, of whom Samuel, 1639/40 - 1707, was the most distinghised. DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY, p. 240

 

****************

The surname Willard has been a personal name since earliest times and was in use as a place name before the establishment of surnames in England, where many branches of the family bore an ancient

coat-of-arms previous to the sixteenth century.

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Simon Willard, Major - Immigrated to America 1634 (29 y.o) - Founder of Concord 4/7/1605 - 5/5/1676 Born in Horsmonden, Kent, England, married Mary Sharp, Mary Dunster, and Elizabeth Dunster. He had 17 children Son of Richard and Margery Willard, colonist, fur trader. He was baptized at Horsemonden, Kent, England, on April 7, 1605. Emigrating to Massachusetts in 1634, he joined with Peter Bulkey and others to establish the town of Concord. From this time until his death, he was one of the leading men on the Merrimac frontier. At Concord he served as local magistrate and commanded the militia company. He represented Concord in the General Court off and on from 1643 to 1654 he was chosen assistant and served until his death. In 1653 he was made sergeant-major of the Middlesex regiment. His activities, both public and private, were closely associated with the Indian trade and the affairs of the frontier settlements. In 1641 he was appointed chief of a committee to carry on and regulate the fur trade, and in 1657 he and three associates farmed the trade of the Merrimac for 25 pounds. In 1646 and afterward he assisted John Eliot in his work among the Merrimac tribes. He was extensively employed by the General Court in Indian affairs, in locating and laying out land grants, in settling the bounds and regulating the affairs of the frontier towns. In 1659 he sold a large part of his Concord estate and removed to Lancaster, Massachusetts. About 1671 he went to live in the southern part of Groton, now Ayer. In 1654 he was appointed to command a punitive expedition against the Niantic sachem, Ninigret. On approach of the English, Ninigret fled into a swamp, and the expedition ended in a parley. Disappointed at the inconclusive outcome, the commissioners of the United Colonies reproved Willard for failure to carry out their instructions. At the outbreak of King Philip's War, in spite of his advanced age, he took charge of the defense of the Merrimac frontier. His most conspicuous service was the relief of Brookfield on August 4, 1675. Ordered thence to the Connecticut Valley, he soon returned to Groton to defend the frontier towns from Chelmsford to Lancaster against the Indians gathered at Mount Wachusett. His duties included the placing of garrisons, the patroling of the frontier with a party of dragoons, and the relief of threatened settlements. Called away from his duties as magistrate, he was absent when the Indians destroyed Groton in March 1676, but he arrived with a relieving force in time to assist in removing the inhabitants. His own house was destroyed and his family forced to remove to Charlestown, thereafter, further service on the frontier, he died, "a pious, orthodox man," according to John Hull (diary in ARCHAELOGIA AMERICANA: TRANS. AND COLLS. AM. ANTIQ. SOC., VOL III 1857, P. 241). He was married three times, first in England to Mary Sharpe, second to Elizabeth, the sister of Henry Dunster, and third to Mary Dunster, either his second wife's sister or cousin. He had seventeen children, of whom Samuel, 1639/40 - 1707, was the most distinghised. DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY, p. 240

 

****************

The surname Willard has been a personal name since earliest times and was in use as a place name before the establishment of surnames in England, where many branches of the family bore an ancient

coat-of-arms previous to the sixteenth century.

 

 

More About Major Simon Willard:

Baptism: Apr 07, 1605, Horsmonden, Kent, England

Burial: Apr 27, 1676, Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts

Emigration: 1634

Military service: Commander of Forces in Ninigret's & Phillip's Wars

iii. George Willard, born Dec 04, 1614; died WFT Est. 1656-1705 in MD (?); married Dorothy Dunster WFT Est. 1656-1688; born 1628; died WFT Est. 1656-1722.

iv. Mary Willard

v. Elizabeth Willard

vi. Catherine Willard

vii. Richard Willard

 

1876. Thomas Blood He was the son of 3752. Edmund Blood.

Child of Thomas Blood is:

938 i. James Blood, born Abt. 1580 in Ruddington, Nottinghamshire, England/Ruddington, England; died Dec 17, 1683 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; married Eleanor Harrison 1630 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England.

 

1878. Edward Harrison

Child of Edward Harrison is:

939 i. Eleanor Harrison, born WFT Est. 1595-1618 in England; died Aug 01, 1674 in Concord, Middlesex, MA; married James Blood 1630 in Puddington, , Nottingham, England.

 

1886. George Merian He married 1887. Susannah.

1887. Susannah

Child of George Merian and Susannah is:

943 i. Sarah Merian, died Feb 01, 1675/76; married Thomas Wheeler.

 

1888. Henry Howland, born Nov 25, 1604 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died Jan 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass. He was the son of 3776. Henry Howland Sr. and 3777. Ann Margaret Aires. He married 1889. Mary Newland.

1889. Mary Newland, died Jun 17, 1674. She was the daughter of 3778. William Newland and 3779. Agnes Greenway.

Notes for Henry Howland:

[Master Tree.FTW]

From the book, "SEVENTEENTH CENTURY COLONIAL ANCESTORS of Members of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century" compiled by Mary Louise M. Hutton, pg.133:

Howland, Henry (_-1671) Mass.; m. Mary Newland; juror; landowner.

********************************************

From the book, "History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to Ye Olde Colonie" by Leon Clark Hills, pg 161:

"Howland, Henry, born England; died Duxbury, Mass., Jan 17, 1671; married Mary Newland; died Duxbury, June 16, 1674. She was a sister of William Newland who came from Lynn in 1637 and settled in Sandwich. She and her brother were Quakers. Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle. In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers."

______________________________________________________________________________

From PLYMOUTH COLONY-ITS HISTORY AND PEOPLE, 1620-1691:

"HENRY HOWLAND-A brother of 1620 Mayflower passenger, John Howland, Henry Howland was in Plymouth at least as early as 25 March 1633, when his name appears on the tax list, and he was also on the original freeman list. On 8 April 1633, Walter Harris had his indenture transferred to Henry Howland. On 5 January 1635/36 Henry became the constable of Duxbury. He was frequently a member of trial and grand juries. On 3 June 1657, he, John Tompson, Morris Truant, Ralph Allen, and Thomas Greenfield refused to serve on the grand jury. On 2 March 1657/58, the same day his brother Arthur was fined for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and for resisting the constable of Marshfield in the execution of his office, Henry Howland was fined ten shillings for entertaining a meeting in his house contrary to court orders. On 7 June 1659 the court, referring to an order disenfranching Quakers and other offenders, gave notice to four men to appear in court the following August, and on 6 October 1659 Howland had his freeman status taken away from him. On 1 May 1660 Henry Howland was charged with entertaining another man's wife in his house after her husband had complained to him, and for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and entertaining a foreign Quaker. He stiffly denied the first charge, and the court noted that the evidence 'did not appeer to make it out,' but he was convicted on the Quaker charges.

On 3 June 1668 he was a highway surveyor for Duxbury.

He made his will 28 November 1670, and he named his wife Mary (her surname is not known; they were possibly married in England), his sons Zoeth, Joseph, John, and Samuel, and his daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, and Abigail."

___________________________________________________________

On the 2nd of March 1657/58 he was fined for entertaining a meeting of Quakers in his home. On the 6th of Oct 1659 he and his brother-in-law, William Newland, were were sentenced "to bee defranchised of their freedom of this corpation".

More About HENRY HOWLAND:

Fact 1: November 25, 1604, Christening: Scrooby Notts, England ?

Notes for MARY NEWLAND (???????????):

Neither Wakefield & Sherman in the NGSQ articles on Henry Howland and his descendants nor Robert Charles Anderson in his "The Great Migration Begins" does accept Mary Newland as proven to be the wife of Henry1 Howland.

Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle. In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers."

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

From the book, "SEVENTEENTH CENTURY COLONIAL ANCESTORS of Members of the National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century" compiled by Mary Louise M. Hutton, pg.133:

Howland, Henry (_-1671) Mass.; m. Mary Newland; juror; landowner.

********************************************

From the book, "History and Genealogy of the Mayflower Planters and First Comers to Ye Olde Colonie" by Leon Clark Hills, pg 161:

"Howland, Henry, born England; died Duxbury, Mass., Jan 17, 1671; married Mary Newland; died Duxbury, June 16, 1674. She was a sister of William Newland who came from Lynn in 1637 and settled in Sandwich. She and her brother were Quakers. Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle. In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers."

______________________________________________________________________________

From PLYMOUTH COLONY-ITS HISTORY AND PEOPLE, 1620-1691:

"HENRY HOWLAND-A brother of 1620 Mayflower passenger, John Howland, Henry Howland was in Plymouth at least as early as 25 March 1633, when his name appears on the tax list, and he was also on the original freeman list. On 8 April 1633, Walter Harris had his indenture transferred to Henry Howland. On 5 January 1635/36 Henry became the constable of Duxbury. He was frequently a member of trial and grand juries. On 3 June 1657, he, John Tompson, Morris Truant, Ralph Allen, and Thomas Greenfield refused to serve on the grand jury. On 2 March 1657/58, the same day his brother Arthur was fined for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and for resisting the constable of Marshfield in the execution of his office, Henry Howland was fined ten shillings for entertaining a meeting in his house contrary to court orders. On 7 June 1659 the court, referring to an order disenfranching Quakers and other offenders, gave notice to four men to appear in court the following August, and on 6 October 1659 Howland had his freeman status taken away from him. On 1 May 1660 Henry Howland was charged with entertaining another man's wife in his house after her husband had complained to him, and for permitting a Quaker meeting in his house and entertaining a foreign Quaker. He stiffly denied the first charge, and the court noted that the evidence 'did not appeer to make it out,' but he was convicted on the Quaker charges.

On 3 June 1668 he was a highway surveyor for Duxbury.

He made his will 28 November 1670, and he named his wife Mary (her surname is not known; they were possibly married in England), his sons Zoeth, Joseph, John, and Samuel, and his daughters Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, and Abigail."

___________________________________________________________

On the 2nd of March 1657/58 he was fined for entertaining a meeting of Quakers in his home. On the 6th of Oct 1659 he and his brother-in-law, William Newland, were were sentenced "to bee defranchised of their freedom of this corpation".

More About HENRY HOWLAND:

Fact 1: November 25, 1604, Christening: Scrooby Notts, England ?

Notes for MARY NEWLAND (???????????):

Neither Wakefield & Sherman in the NGSQ articles on Henry Howland and his descendants nor Robert Charles Anderson in his "The Great Migration Begins" does accept Mary Newland as proven to be the wife of Henry1 Howland.

Henry resided for a while in Plymouth, but became an early settler in Duxbury "by the bayside, near Love Brewster." He was a surveyor of highways, and was able to bear arms in 1643. As a Quaker he suffered the persecutions of the times. On April 2, 1659 Henry with 26 others bought of the Indians what is now Freetown, for a few old coats, rugs, iron pots, etc. including "one little kittle. In 1664 he purchased a large portion of land in Mattapoisett (Swansea). Henry was owner of the sixth lot in Freetown. However, his sons, John and Samuel, really became the actual settlers."

 

More About Henry Howland:

Immigration: He arrived in Plymouth,Ma. in 1623 on the Anne, sister ship of the Mayflower

More About Mary Newland:

Religion: Quaker

Children of Henry Howland and Mary Newland are:

944 i. Samual Howland, born 1638 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; died May 07, 1716 in Freetown, Bristol, Mass; married Mary Sampson.

ii. Zoeth Howland, born Jan 31, 1635/36 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; died Mar 28, 1676 in Puncatest, RI; married Abigail Dec 1656.

Notes for Zoeth Howland:

[Master Tree.FTW]

New England Families : "Zoeth, son of Henry Howland, was born in Duxbury, and married Abigail _____, 1656. He was killed by Indians, January 21, 1676, at Pocaset. Abigail married (second), February 12, 1678, John Kirby Jr. He [Zoeth] took the oath of 'fidelitie' at Duxbury in 1657, and became a convert to the Friends' [Quakers] sect about the same time, and meetings were held at his house, for which for which he was fined in December, 1657. In March, 1657-58, he was sentenced to 'sitt in the stockes for the space of an hour' for 'speaking opprobiously of the minnesters of Gods Word.' In March, 1659, his wife was fined ten shillings for not attending the meetings of the Puritans. He moved to Dartmouth, probably as early as 1662, for more congenial society. The Newport [RI] Friends' records and the inventory of his estate, dated June, 1677, refer to him as Zoeth of Dartmouth, and his mother owned a house there. Just where he was killed and how he came to be there is unknown. His sons, with the exception of Samuel, were active members of the old Apponegansett meeting. The first eight children are recorded in the Newport Friends' records..." [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

New England Families : "Zoeth, son of Henry Howland, was born in Duxbury, and married Abigail _____, 1656. He was killed by Indians, January 21, 1676, at Pocaset. Abigail married (second), February 12, 1678, John Kirby Jr. He [Zoeth] took the oath of 'fidelitie' at Duxbury in 1657, and became a convert to the Friends' [Quakers] sect about the same time, and meetings were held at his house, for which for which he was fined in December, 1657. In March, 1657-58, he was sentenced to 'sitt in the stockes for the space of an hour' for 'speaking opprobiously of the minnesters of Gods Word.' In March, 1659, his wife was fined ten shillings for not attending the meetings of the Puritans. He moved to Dartmouth, probably as early as 1662, for more congenial society. The Newport [RI] Friends' records and the inventory of his estate, dated June, 1677, refer to him as Zoeth of Dartmouth, and his mother owned a house there. Just where he was killed and how he came to be there is unknown. His sons, with the exception of Samuel, were active members of the old Apponegansett meeting. The first eight children are recorded in the Newport Friends' records..."

iii. John Howland

iv. Joseph Howland

 

1890. Abraham Sampson He was the son of 3780. Lawrence Sampson. He married 1891. Esther Nash.

1891. Esther Nash She was the daughter of 3782. Samuel Nash.

Children of Abraham Sampson and Esther Nash are:

945 i. Mary Sampson, married Samual Howland.

ii. Elizabeth Sampson

iii. Samuel Sampson

 

1904. Matthew Cushing, born Mar 02, 1588/89 in Hardingham, England; died Sep 30, 1660 in Hingham, Massachusetts. He was the son of 3808. Peter Cushing and 3809. Susan Hawes. He married 1905. Nazareth Pitcher Aug 15, 1613.

1905. Nazareth Pitcher, born Oct 30, 1586; died 1682 in Hingham, Mass..

Notes for Matthew Cushing:

 

Matthew Cushing was third child of Peter and Susan [Hawes] Cushing. For the first 50 years of his life,he lived in Hardingham, and Hingham, England. In 1638, he, with his wife and five children, embarked for America. He sailed in the ship "Diligent" of Ipswich, which left Gravesend Apr. 26, 1638, with 133 passengers, among whom was his wife's sister [widow Frances Riecroft, who died a few weeks after their arrival in the colonies]. Among the passengers, also, was Robert Peck, M.A., Rector of the Parish of Hingham, Eng. The immediate occasion of their departure seems to have been trouble in ecclesiastical matters. Their rector, doubtless with the aid of most of the emigrating party, had pulled down the rails of chancel and altar and leveled the latter a foot below the church, as it remains to this day. Being prosecuted by Bishop Wren, he left the kingdom, together with his friends, who sold their estates for half their value. The party, having landed at Boston, Mass., Aug. 10, 1638, immediately proceeded to their destination, Hingham, Mass., so named after the former home of the Cushings in England. At a town meeting held in 1638, a house lot of five acres, on Main St., was given to Matthew Cushing, and it continued in the possession of the Cushing family until 1887. He was engaged in the public affairs of the town, became deacon in Rev. Hobart's church, and was progenitor of many eminent descendants.

His will, which was a verbal one, was written after his decease by his children, who, under date of Nov. 15, pray that Daniel Cushing, Esq., their eldest brother, may be appointed administrator of their father's estate.

Matthew Cushing is the ancestor of all the Cushings in America, rendering famous in the annals of American history as "the family of Judges". [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

Matthew Cushing was third child of Peter and Susan [Hawes] Cushing. For the first 50 years of his life,he lived in Hardingham, and Hingham, England. In 1638, he, with his wife and five children, embarked for America. He sailed in the ship "Diligent" of Ipswich, which left Gravesend Apr. 26, 1638, with 133 passengers, among whom was his wife's sister [widow Frances Riecroft, who died a few weeks after their arrival in the colonies]. Among the passengers, also, was Robert Peck, M.A., Rector of the Parish of Hingham, Eng. The immediate occasion of their departure seems to have been trouble in ecclesiastical matters. Their rector, doubtless with the aid of most of the emigrating party, had pulled down the rails of chancel and altar and leveled the latter a foot below the church, as it remains to this day. Being prosecuted by Bishop Wren, he left the kingdom, together with his friends, who sold their estates for half their value. The party, having landed at Boston, Mass., Aug. 10, 1638, immediately proceeded to their destination, Hingham, Mass., so named after the former home of the Cushings in England. At a town meeting held in 1638, a house lot of five acres, on Main St., was given to Matthew Cushing, and it continued in the possession of the Cushing family until 1887. He was engaged in the public affairs of the town, became deacon in Rev. Hobart's church, and was progenitor of many eminent descendants.

His will, which was a verbal one, was written after his decease by his children, who, under date of Nov. 15, pray that Daniel Cushing, Esq., their eldest brother, may be appointed administrator of their father's estate.

Matthew Cushing is the ancestor of all the Cushings in America, rendering famous in the annals of American history as "the family of Judges".

 

MATTHEW, Hingham 1638, from Hingham in Norfolk County. Son of Peter, born in 1588, the year of the Spanish Armada, married 5 August 1613, Nazareth Pitcher, had, as by register of old Hingham appears, Daniel, baptized 20 April 1619; Jeremiah, 1 January 1621; Matthew, 5 April 1623; Deborah, 17 February 1625; and John, whose baptism is, I believe, omitted and I have heard, that it was in a neighboring parish; came in the Diligent, embarked at Gravesend, 26 April and landed at Boston 10 August 1638, with that wife and those children He is the ancestor of all the myriads of this name in New England and thence indefinitely spread; and died 30 December 1660. His widow died 1681, aged 95, as is said. Her sister widow Frances Ricroft came in the same voyage, but died in few weeks after arriving. In his will all the children except Deborah, who married May 1648, Matthew Briggs, are named as living; and the share to this son-in-law was large.

 

More About Matthew Cushing:

Baptism: Mar 02, 1588/89, Hardingham, England

Immigration: 1638, he embarked in the ship Diligent of Ipswich, 350 tons, John Martin, master, which sailed from Gravesend 26 Apr 1638

More About Nazareth Pitcher:

Fact 1: Died on January 6th.

Children of Matthew Cushing and Nazareth Pitcher are:

i. Daniel Cushing, born Apr 20, 1619 in Hingham, England; died Dec 03, 1700 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married (1) Elizabeth Jacob WFT Est. 1660-1689; born 1632 in England; died Nov 24, 1725 in Hingham, Mass.; married (2) Lydia Gilman Jan 19, 1644/45; born WFT Est. 1583-1633 in Hingham, England; died Mar 12, 1688/89 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

More About Daniel Cushing:

Event 1: Wheelwright & merchant

Occupation: Wheelwright & merchant

ii. Jeremiah Cushing, born Jul 21, 1621; died WFT Est. 1666-1713; married Elizabeth Wilkie Mar 11, 1661/62 in Boston, Mass; born WFT Est. 1617-1645; died WFT Est. 1667-1733.

iii. Matthew Cushing, born Apr 05, 1623 in Hingham, England; died Jan 09, 1700/01 in Hingham, Mass; married Sarah Jacob Feb 25, 1652/53; born WFT Est. 1614-1636; died Aug 08, 1701 in Hingham, Mass..

Notes for Matthew Cushing:

Matthew Cushing, son of Peter Cushing married Nazareth Pitcher, daughter of Henry Pitcher, of the famous family of Admiral Pitcher of England. For the first fifty years of his life he lived in Hardingham and Hingham, Norfolk County, England, until 1638, when with his wife and five children, and his wife's sister (Widow Francis Riecroft, who died a few weeks after their arrival). He embarked in the ship "Diligent" of Ipswich, 350 tons, John Martin, master, which sailed from Gravesend, 26 April 1638, with 133 passengers, among whom was Robert Peck, M.A., Rector of the parish of Hingham, England. The immediate occasion of their departure seems to have been trouble in ecclesiastical matters. Their rector, doubtless with the sympathy and aid of most of those constituting the emigrating party, had pulled down the rails of chancel and altar, and leveled the latter a foot below the church, as it remains to this day. Being prosecuted by Bishop Wren, he left the Kingdom, together with his friends - who sold their estates at half their real value. The party, having landed at Boston Massachusetts, 10 August 1638, immediately proceeded to their destination, Hingham, Massachusetts, so named after the name of the former home of the Cushing family in England. At a town meeting held in 1638, a house lot of five acres, first below Pear Tree Hill, on Bachelor (Main) St., was given to Matthew Cushing, and it continued in the possession of the family until 1887. He was early engaged in the public affairs of the town, became a deacon in Rev. Hobart's church, and was the progenitor of many eminent descendants. It is now a pretty well established fact that, with the exception of a few families who have come to this country during the past century, all the persons bearing the surname of Cushing in the United States and Canada are his direct lineal descendants. His will, which was a verbal one, was written after his decease by his children, who, under date of 15 Nov., 1660, pray that Daniel Cushing, Esq., their oldest brother, may be appointed administrator of their father's estate. In his will all the children except Deborah, who married May 1648, Matthew Briggs, are named as living; and the share to his son-in-law was large.

Passengers:

Rev. Robert Peck, Mrs. Peck, Anne Peck, Joseph Peck, Joseph Peck, Mrs. ......Peck,

Edward Gillman, Mrs. Mary Gilman, Edward Gilman, Moses Gilman, Lydia Gilman, Sarah Gilman, John Gilman,

John Folsom, Mrs. Mary Folsom, John Folsom,

Mrs. Christian Chamberlain, Henry Chamberlain, Mrs. .......Chamberlain, .... Chamberlain, ....Chamberlain,

Stephen Gates, Mrs. Anne Gates, Elizabeth Gates, Mary Gates,

George Knights, Mrs.......Knights, ....Knights,

Thomas Cooper, Mrs. Cooper, ....Cooper, ....Cooper,

Francis James, Mrs. Elizabeth James,

Matthew Hawke, Mrs. Margaret Hawke,

Matthew Cushing, Mrs. Nazareth Cushing, Daniel Cushing, Jeremiah Cushing, Matthew Cushing, John Cushing, Deborah Cushing,

Tohn Tufts,

Robert Skoulding,

Elizabeth Sayer, Mary Sayer,

John Fearing,

Philip James, Mrs. Jane James, ....James, ....James, ....James, ....James,

Stephen Paine, Mrs. Rose Paine, ....Paine, ....Paine, ....Paine, ....Paine,

John Sutton, Mrs. Elizabeth Sutton, Hannah Sutton, John Sutton, Jr., Nathaniel Sutton, Elizabeth Sutton,

Mrs. Joan Lincoln, Stephen Lincoln, Mrs. ....Lincoln, Stephen Lincoln, Jr.,

Samuel Packer, Mrs. Elizabeth Packer, ....Packer,

Henry Smith, Mrs. Judith Smith, John Smith, Henry Smith, Daniel Smith, Judith Smith, Elizabeth Smith,

Bozoun Allen, Mrs. Anne Allen,

William Ripley, Mrs. ....Ripley, Mary Ripley, John Ripley, Abraham Ripley, Sarah Ripley,

Thomas Sucklin,

Richard Baxter,

William Pitts,

Edward Mitchell,

James Buck,

John Morfield,

Thomas Lincoln,

Jeremiah Moore,

and about 20 servants.

(Planters of the Commonwealth by C.E. Banks, Boston, 1930)

Upon the lot now occupied by Dr. Robbins at the foot of Pear-tree Hill, a few rods north of his residence, Matthew Cushing, who died in 1660 at seventy-one years of age, the progenitor, probably, of all the families of that name in the United States, had established the home which remained uninterruptedly in the family until 1887; and here still lived his wife, who died subsequently to the war, aged ninety-six, his son Daniel, then and until his death town clerk, and one of the wealthy men of the period, and Matthew a grandson, afterwards lieutenant and captain. Not far away Matthew Cushing senior's daughter Deborah lived with her husband, Matthias Briggs, while on the opposite side of the street, at what is now the Keeshan place, Daniel the younger, a weaver by trade, established a home and reared a large family. The Cushings were shopkeepers in addition to their other occupations, and probably the little end shop built onto the dwelling on either side of the street contained articles of sale and barter,--produce and pelts and West India goods and ammunition. We may suppose that these small centres of trade, together with the tannery in the immediate vicinity, gave quite a little air of business to the neighborhood,--forming indeed the primitive exchange of the period.

 

iv. Deborah Cushing, born Feb 17, 1624/25 in Hingham, England; died Sep 25, 1700 in Hingham, Mass; married Matthias Briggs WFT Est. 1653-1685; born WFT Est. 1608-1628; died Feb 24, 1696/97.

952 v. John Cushing, born 1627; died Mar 31, 1708; married Sarah Hawke 1658.

 

1906. Matthew Hawke, died Dec 11, 1684. He married 1907. Margaret Nelson.

1907. Margaret Nelson

Child of Matthew Hawke and Margaret Nelson is:

953 i. Sarah Hawke, born Aug 01, 1641; died WFT Est. 1663-1730; married John Cushing 1658.

 

1908. William Barrell He married 1909. <Unnamed>.

1909. <Unnamed>

Child of William Barrell and <Unnamed> is:

954 i. William Barrrell, married Lydia.

 

1912. Joseph (Souther) Sowther, born Abt. 1637 in England; died Bet. Dec 14, 1696 - Nov 27, 1721 in Boston, Mass.

Child of Joseph (Souther) Sowther is:

956 i. Joseph Souther, born Aug 20, 1658 in Boston, Mass; died Jan 02, 1695/96 in Boston, Mass.

 

1916. John Tower, born May 17, 1609 in Hingham, England; died Feb 13, 1699/00 in Hingham, Massachusetts. He was the son of 3832. Robert Tower and 3833. Dorothy Damon. He married 1917. Margaret Ibrook Feb 16, 1638/39 in Charlestow, Suffolk , Massachusetts.

1917. Margaret Ibrook, born Sep 03, 1620 in Southwold, Suffolk Co, England; died May 15, 1700 in Hingham, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 3834. Richard Ibrook and 3835. Margaret Clark.

Notes for John Tower:

He resided The Tower House in Hingham, Plymouth Colony. (4392) According to a history of the town of Hingham (511), "This house stands on the east side of Main Street near the brook that runs between Hingham Centre and South Hingham. It was built by John Tower , an original settler, near the middle of the seventeenth century. A well dug by him is still in use [in 1911]. The house has been in possession of his direct descendants ever since, and although additions and repairs have been made, the original structure is still standing and constitutes a part of the Tower homestead today. It has been put in excellent condition and is a picturesque feature. Two year ago in May [1911] the descendants of John Tower formed a family Tower Association , and in large numbers celebrated the three hundred anniversary of his birth." received grant of 3 acres for a house-lot on Bachelor (Main) Street, also a great lot of 10 acres, a 4-acre planting lot, and 1 1/2 acres of salt marsh on the north side of Layford River

 

 

 

 

More About John Tower:

Event: Mar 13, 1638/39, Freeman

Immigrated: 1637, To Hingham, Massachusetts

Military service: King Phillip's War

Occupation: Planter

Children of John Tower and Margaret Ibrook are:

i. John Tower, born Dec 13, 1639 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

ii. Johnathan Tower, born Aug 01, 1641 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

958 iii. Ibrook Tower, born Feb 07, 1643/44 in Hingham, Massachusetts; died Nov 21, 1731; married Margaret Harding Apr 24, 1668.

iv. Jeremiah Tower, born Mar 09, 1645/46 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

v. Elizabeth Tower, born Oct 09, 1648 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

vi. Sarah Tower, born Jul 16, 1650 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

vii. Hannah Tower, born Jul 17, 1652 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

viii. Benjamin Tower, born Nov 05, 1654 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

ix. Jemina Tower, born Apr 25, 1660 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

x. Samuel Tower, born Jan 26, 1661/62 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

 

1918. John Hardin He married 1919. Eunice Benson.

1919. Eunice Benson She was the daughter of 3838. Jonathan Benson.

Child of John Hardin and Eunice Benson is:

959 i. Margaret Harding, born 1647; died Nov 19, 1705; married Ibrook Tower Apr 24, 1668.

 

1920. Robert Hibbert, born Abt. 1613 in Salisbury, England; died May 07, 1684 in Beverly, Massachusetts. He was the son of 3840. John Hibbert Sr and 3841. Joane Fairfeild. He married 1921. Joanna Luff 1640 in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1921. Joanna Luff, born 1614 in Salem, Massachusetts; died Apr 06, 1696. She was the daughter of 3842. John Luff and 3843. Bridget.

Notes for Robert Hibbert:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Hibbert.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0283, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

GENEALOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine George Hibbard, 1901

p 11

"Robert came to Salem with his wife at some time between 1635 and 1639. We have found statements by his descendants that he came with Governor Winthrop; that he came in his employ as a saltmaker. One member of the family has written: "It is believed that the original emigrant came from England to Salem as a member of the company known as the 'great immigration' which came under the direction and patronage of Governor Endicott. The company came in a convoy of ships numbering some eight or ten vessels." Another has the usual "three brothers."

"There is no evidence to support either of these statements so far as the writer can learn. Endicott left England in 1629, was made Governor in 1644, and Robert was in Salem previous to that date.

"From Savage Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 408:

"Robert Hibbard, Salem, Mass, with wife Joan, was admitted to church May 17, 1646, and then had children baptized: Mary, b. Nov. 27, 1641; John, born Jan.24, 1643; Sarah, born Sept. 26, 1644; Joseph and Robert, born May 7, 1648; Joanna, born March 9, 1655; Samuel, b. June 20, 1658; lived in that part which became Beverly; there died May 7, 1684."

"The record gleaned from different sources, shows peculiar variations from the above. The year given in each instance and the day of the month, except in a single instance, are the same, the month different. It will be noticed that when compared with date of baptism, the latter in some instances precedes the date of birth. Savage has an unenviable reputation for accuracy."

"There are several traditions in the family as to its origin in this country. One of my correspondents writes: "Two brothers came out from England either shortly before or with Lord Dartmouth. From these two brothers all the HIbbards in America descended.

Another: "Our grandfather's brother" [referring to the first immigrant] "received a large grant of land in the Colony of Mass.--now New Hampshire--and also a certain monopoly on salt.

J.M.H. of Windham, Conn., writes: "Robert Hebard came to this country from Old England with Governor Winthrop, A.D. 1632, a a salt maker. King James II gave him a warrant for 640 acres as an inducement for him to come, and this was located in this town, of which the present homestead is a part."

I find no records that justify either of these statements; on the contrary, the deeds and wills by which the Hibbards have obtained and disposed of property contradict them wholly, except that the first immigrant was a salt-maker. he was also a brick-maker, and the location of his works can be determined at the present time. He had but little property, but his circumstances would have been called, "comfortable" at the time he lived. In the records of Salem, and later, Beverly, it appears that the name was respected and Hibbards held town offices and were memebers of the church in the place of their residence.

 

His autograph is pictured in Perley's History of Salem.

Between 1635 and 1638.

Apprenticed to "Thomas Underhill, weaver: Robert, son of John

Hybberd, labourer, quilling, he earneth 7d. and may earn 8d. weekly."

A "quilling" was the lad that sat under the loom and winds the yarn on

spools and feeds it out. It is also a term of reproach, a person

incapable of much work. Mr. Underhill lived in the Griffin chequer on

the east side of Greencroft St. in Salisbury. That location is just

down the street a few blocks from St. Edmund's Parish Church, which is

now the Arts Center of Salisbury. On the Poor Rolls of Salisbury in

a book, "Poverty in Early-Stuart Salisbury."About halfway between Cabot and Heather Sts.

From "Descendants of Robert Hebert of Salem and Beverly, Mass." in GENEALOGIES OF CONNECTICUT FAMILIES, VOL. II, compiled by Harvey Hebard and Ralph D. Smyth (son of Lovine Hebert); and communicated by Bernard C. Steiner, Ph.D. (grandson of Ralph D. Smyth:

We hear of Robert Hebart and his wife Joan first at Salem, Mass., where he was an early settler. His name appeared in the list of settlers for 1646: "Robert Hibberd and wife Joan." Felt (ANNALS OF SALEM, ii, 175, 176) states that he was in Salem in 1639, and refers to him as "Robert Hebard, salt-maker." He may have been one of those who came over for the purpose of assisting John Winthrop, Jr., at his salt works. The records of the First Church of Salem state that "Rob't Hebbert and Joanna his wife" were admitted to communion May 3, 1646. In 1659, he bought thirteen acres of land in Salem from William Hascoll, and is described as "Robert Hibbird, bricklayer." (ESSEX DEEDS, Book iv., p. 87) He is then described as "Robert Hibbert, bricklayer." His will is dated April 9, 1684 (ESSEX PROBATE RECORDS, Book No. 2, Old Series, pg. 35), and to it he makes his mark, which, as he could write, shows him to have been very feeble. In the will, he states that he has already made some provision for his children during his life time, and confirms these grants. A life estate in most of the property is given to his wife, and she is made executrix. The inventory of the estate was £281.6.6.

 

 

 

 

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Hibbert.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #0283, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

GENEALOGY OF THE HIBBARD FAMILY, by Augustine George Hibbard, 1901

p 11

"Robert came to Salem with his wife at some time between 1635 and 1639. We have found statements by his descendants that he came with Governor Winthrop; that he came in his employ as a saltmaker. One member of the family has written: "It is believed that the original emigrant came from England to Salem as a member of the company known as the 'great immigration' which came under the direction and patronage of Governor Endicott. The company came in a convoy of ships numbering some eight or ten vessels." Another has the usual "three brothers."

"There is no evidence to support either of these statements so far as the writer can learn. Endicott left England in 1629, was made Governor in 1644, and Robert was in Salem previous to that date.

"From Savage Genealogy, Vol. II, p. 408:

"Robert Hibbard, Salem, Mass, with wife Joan, was admitted to church May 17, 1646, and then had children baptized: Mary, b. Nov. 27, 1641; John, born Jan.24, 1643; Sarah, born Sept. 26, 1644; Joseph and Robert, born May 7, 1648; Joanna, born March 9, 1655; Samuel, b. June 20, 1658; lived in that part which became Beverly; there died May 7, 1684."

"The record gleaned from different sources, shows peculiar variations from the above. The year given in each instance and the day of the month, except in a single instance, are the same, the month different. It will be noticed that when compared with date of baptism, the latter in some instances precedes the date of birth. Savage has an unenviable reputation for accuracy."

"There are several traditions in the family as to its origin in this country. One of my correspondents writes: "Two brothers came out from England either shortly before or with Lord Dartmouth. From these two brothers all the HIbbards in America descended.

Another: "Our grandfather's brother" [referring to the first immigrant] "received a large grant of land in the Colony of Mass.--now New Hampshire--and also a certain monopoly on salt.

J.M.H. of Windham, Conn., writes: "Robert Hebard came to this country from Old England with Governor Winthrop, A.D. 1632, a a salt maker. King James II gave him a warrant for 640 acres as an inducement for him to come, and this was located in this town, of which the present homestead is a part."

I find no records that justify either of these statements; on the contrary, the deeds and wills by which the Hibbards have obtained and disposed of property contradict them wholly, except that the first immigrant was a salt-maker. he was also a brick-maker, and the location of his works can be determined at the present time. He had but little property, but his circumstances would have been called, "comfortable" at the time he lived. In the records of Salem, and later, Beverly, it appears that the name was respected and Hibbards held town offices and were memebers of the church in the place of their residence.

 

His autograph is pictured in Perley's History of Salem.

Between 1635 and 1638.

Apprenticed to "Thomas Underhill, weaver: Robert, son of John

Hybberd, labourer, quilling, he earneth 7d. and may earn 8d. weekly."

A "quilling" was the lad that sat under the loom and winds the yarn on

spools and feeds it out. It is also a term of reproach, a person

incapable of much work. Mr. Underhill lived in the Griffin chequer on

the east side of Greencroft St. in Salisbury. That location is just

down the street a few blocks from St. Edmund's Parish Church, which is

now the Arts Center of Salisbury. On the Poor Rolls of Salisbury in

a book, "Poverty in Early-Stuart Salisbury."About halfway between Cabot and Heather Sts.

From "Descendants of Robert Hebert of Salem and Beverly, Mass." in GENEALOGIES OF CONNECTICUT FAMILIES, VOL. II, compiled by Harvey Hebard and Ralph D. Smyth (son of Lovine Hebert); and communicated by Bernard C. Steiner, Ph.D. (grandson of Ralph D. Smyth:

We hear of Robert Hebart and his wife Joan first at Salem, Mass., where he was an early settler. His name appeared in the list of settlers for 1646: "Robert Hibberd and wife Joan." Felt (ANNALS OF SALEM, ii, 175, 176) states that he was in Salem in 1639, and refers to him as "Robert Hebard, salt-maker." He may have been one of those who came over for the purpose of assisting John Winthrop, Jr., at his salt works. The records of the First Church of Salem state that "Rob't Hebbert and Joanna his wife" were admitted to communion May 3, 1646. In 1659, he bought thirteen acres of land in Salem from William Hascoll, and is described as "Robert Hibbird, bricklayer." (ESSEX DEEDS, Book iv., p. 87) He is then described as "Robert Hibbert, bricklayer." His will is dated April 9, 1684 (ESSEX PROBATE RECORDS, Book No. 2, Old Series, pg. 35), and to it he makes his mark, which, as he could write, shows him to have been very feeble. In the will, he states that he has already made some provision for his children during his life time, and confirms these grants. A life estate in most of the property is given to his wife, and she is made executrix. The inventory of the estate was £281.6.6.

Puritan AFT 17 MAY 1646

First Church in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony Last Will on 9 May 1664, Robert Sr. of Beverly (Essex) Ne

w England. Gives wive Joane his house, barn, pastures and tillage and all other appurtenaces including his salt. This also included the marshland near Jno. Woodberys, all the cattle, swine.

To son Jno. Joseph and Robert several parcels of land tha t was formally distributed to them.

To his daughters, land that has already been distributed.

To son John at hi swofe's death, u the upper part of the up land and the upper part of the marsh being more that half of his land and possessions.

To son Sam his homesteratf and other par of uypland and Mea dow or marsh ground if he behaves his mother and then to be on his own at her decease.

Joan is the executrix witnessed aided by Jn Sallows and Jno . Benit.

10 shillings each to all his dauthers.

His wearing apparrell to his sons

Witnessed by Samuel Hardye and Jno Grover. Resided on the south side of Colon St. about halfway betwee

n Cabot and Heather Sts., Salem. Owned 13 acres of land in Salem in 1659 as original property owner. May have come to help John Winthrop, Jr. in his salt works. He had little property but was comfortable for his time.

1st deed to Robert Hibbard recorded in Essex Register of De eds, Bk 1, Salem, p. 63: 13 acres of upland on the Bass River from William Hascoll. Land within the township of Salem. Dated 30 Apr 1859.

A second deed is for a parcel of land on Cape Ann, dated 1 8 Nov 1644. "When Robert Hibbert was about 23, he had been connected with the younger John Winthrop's venture in slat making and living with his at the slat house in 1638."

In the Essex Quarterly Court 13 Jan 1644/5 he certified a s to the births of his first 3 children. Robert and Joanne Hebert were on the 1646 list of settlers of Salem.

Robert was made a freeman 6 Jul 1647.

On 9 Nov 1650, Robert' S request for 20 acres was grante d from commonage and wood near William Dodge and Roger Haskall's. On 18 Nov 1664 Robert had a deed to land on Cape Ann. He lived on the south side of Colon St in Beverly and in 1670/1 conveyed land there to a married daughter.Quilling. Apprenticed to "Thomas Underhill, weaver: Robert

, son of John Hybberd, labourer, quilling, he earneth 7d. and may earn 8d. weekly." A "quilling" was the lad that sat under the loom and winds the yarn on spools and feeds it out. It is also a term of reproach, a person incapable of much work. Mr. Underhill lived in the Griffin chequer on the east side of Greencroft St. in Salisbury. That location is just down the street a few blocks from St. Edmund's Parish Church, which is now the Arts Center of Salisbury.

On the Poor Rolls of Salisbury in a book, "Poverty in Early -Stuart Salisbury."Elizabeth Pippitt Shapiro dalshap@aol.com

His autograph is pictured in Perley's History of Salem

Saltmaker, Bricklayer, and Brickmaker.

Couple were admitted to communion on 3 May 1646.

Title: Descendants of Thomas Farr of Harpswell, Maine and Ninety A

llied Families.Author: Edith Bartlett Sumner

Publication: Los Angeles, California: American Offset Printers, 1959.

er.)Page: p. 192

Quality: 3

Title: The History of Salem, Massachusetts.

 

Page: 2:15.

Author: Sidney Perley

Publication: Salem, MA: Sidney Perley, 1926.

Title: History of Salem, Massachusetts.

 

Page: 2:15.

Author: Sidney Perley

Publication: Salem, MA: Sidney Perley, 1926.

Title: Genealogy of the Hibbard Family, who are descendants of Rob

ert Hibbard of Salem, Mass.: update of 1901 ed., by Frederic A. Hibbard.Author: Hibbard, Frederic A., (ed)

Publication: Salem MA: Higginson Book Company, 1992

Title: Genealogy of the Hibbard Family, descendants of Robert Hibb

ard of Salem, MA, 268pAuthor: Hibbard, Frederic A.

Publication: Woodstock, CT: 1992. $39.50

148 Washington Street

PO Box 778

Salem MA 01970

Title: American Ancestors and Cousins of The Princess of Wales.

Author: Gary Boyd Roberts and William Addams Reitwiesner

Publication: Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1984.

Title: American Ancestors and Cousins of The Princess of Wales.

Author: Roberts, Gary Boyd and William Addams Reitwiesner

Publication: Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 198

4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More About Robert Hibbert:

Baptism: Mar 13, 1612/13, St. Edmunds, Salisbury, Wilts, England

Emigration: 1635-1638 Salem (Essex) Massachusetts from England

Occupation: Saltmaker, Bricklayer, and Brickmaker

Property: twenty acres for commonage and wood After 9 Nov 1650 Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony

Religion: Puritan After 17 May 1646 First Church in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony 1

Residence: on the south side of Colon St. Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony

Will: May 09, 1664, Beverly, Massachusetts

Children of Robert Hibbert and Joanna Luff are:

960 i. John Hibbert, born Nov 24, 1642 in Beverly, Massachusetts; died Mar 27, 1718 in Salem, Massachusetts; married (1) Abigail Graves; married (2) Lydia; married (3) Ruth Walden Sep 16, 1679.

ii. Mary Hibbert, born Nov 27, 1641.

iii. Sarah Hibbert, born Sep 26, 1644; died Dec 08, 1644.

iv. Joseph Hibbert, died May 14, 1701; married Abigail Graves Oct 20, 1670.

More About Joseph Hibbert:

Baptism: May 07, 1648

v. Robert Hibbert, married Mary.

More About Robert Hibbert:

Baptism: May 07, 1648

vi. Hannah Hibbert

vii. Joanna Hibbert

More About Joanna Hibbert:

Baptism: Mar 09, 1651/52

viii. Elizabeth Hibbert

More About Elizabeth Hibbert:

Baptism: May 01, 1653

ix. Abigail Hibbert, married Thomas Blashfeild Mar 28, 1676.

More About Abigail Hibbert:

Baptism: May 09, 1655

x. Samuel Hibbert, married Mary Bond.

More About Samuel Hibbert:

Baptism: Jun 02, 1658

 

1922. Edward Walden He was the son of 3844. William Walden and 3845. Catherine Ranen. He married 1909. <Unnamed>.

1909. <Unnamed>

Child of Edward Walden and <Unnamed> is:

961 i. Ruth Walden, born 1659 in Wendham, Mass; died Abt. 1701; married John Hibbert Sep 16, 1679.

 

1924. John Graves, born WFT Est. 1608-1641 in England; died Sep 19, 1677 in Hatfield, Massachusetts. He was the son of 3848. Thomas Graves and 3849. Sarah. He married 1925. Mary Smith Abt. 1652.

1925. Mary Smith, born Abt. 1630 in England, Suffolk, Eng; died Dec 16, 1668 in Hadley, Hampshire, MA. She was the daughter of 3850. Samuel Smith and 3851. Elizabeth Chileab.

More About Mary Smith:

Christening: Oct 09, 1628, Of Hatfield, Hampshire, MA

Child of John Graves and Mary Smith is:

962 i. Capt. Ebenezer Graves, born Nov 20, 1666 in Hatfield, Massachusetts; died WFT Est. 1667-1756; married Ann Rouse.

 

1936. Roger Eastman He was the son of 3872. John Eastman and 3873. Anna. He married 1937. Sarah Smith.

1937. Sarah Smith

Child of Roger Eastman and Sarah Smith is:

968 i. Phillip Eastman, born Oct 20, 1644 in Salisbury, Massachusetts; died Bef. 1714; married Mary (Barnard) Morse Aug 22, 1678.

 

1938. Thomas Barnard He married 1939. Elenor.

1939. Elenor

Children of Thomas Barnard and Elenor are:

969 i. Mary (Barnard) Morse, married Phillip Eastman Aug 22, 1678.

971 ii. Ruth Barnard, born Oct 16, 1651; died Nov 05, 1723; married Joseph Peaslee Jan 21, 1670/71 in Amesbury, Or Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts.

 

1940. Joseph Peaslee, born WFT Est. 1593-1623 in Newbury, Essex, Ma.; died Dec 03, 1660 in Salisbury, Essex, MA. He was the son of 3880. William Peasley and 3881. Anne Calvert. He married 1941. Mary Johnson WFT Est. 1636-1656.

1941. Mary Johnson, born 1604 in Of Haverhill, Essex, MA; died Sep 27, 1694 in Havervill, Essex, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of 3882. John Johnson.

More About Joseph Peaslee:

Fact 1: Immigrant Anc.

Child of Joseph Peaslee and Mary Johnson is:

970 i. Joseph Peaslee, born Sep 09, 1646; died Mar 21, 1733/34 in Haverhill, Esses, MA; married (1) Ruth Barnard Jan 21, 1670/71 in Amesbury, Or Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts; married (2) Mary Davis WFT Est. 1677-1711; married (3) Mary Tucker Jun 08, 1724 in Newbury, Essex, MA.

 

1952. Richard Morrill, born in Portsmouth, NH.

Child of Richard Morrill is:

976 i. John Morrill, born 1640 in Kittery, York, ME; died 1723; married Sarah Hodson 1667.

 

1954. Nicholas Hodson He married 1955. Elizabeth Needham.

1955. Elizabeth Needham

Child of Nicholas Hodson and Elizabeth Needham is:

977 i. Sarah Hodson, born 1650; married John Morrill 1667.

 

1958. Christian Remick He married 1959. Hannah Foster.

1959. Hannah Foster

Child of Christian Remick and Hannah Foster is:

979 i. Mary Remick, born Aug 07, 1658 in Kittery, Maine; died Aft. 1708; married Peter Dixon Abt. 1678.

 

Generation No. 12

2512. Roberte Tinkecomb

Child of Roberte Tinkecomb is:

1256 i. John Tinkecomb, born 1590 in Devonshire, England; died Dec 17, 1629 in Devonshire, England.

 

3712. Richard Laughton He was the son of 7424. Thomas Laughton.

Child of Richard Laughton is:

1856 i. Thomas Loughton, married Elizabeth Franklin.

 

3748. Symon Willard, born Abt. 1584 in Horsmonden, Kent, England; died Feb 26, 1583/84 in Goudhurst, Kent, England. He was the son of 7496. Richard Willard. He married 3749. Elizabeth Rode Abt. 1560 in Horsmonden, Kent, England.

3749. Elizabeth Rode, born Abt. 1532 in Horsmonden, Kent, England; died Apr 12, 1587 in Horsmond, Kent, England.

More About Symon Willard:

Will: Feb 26, 1583/84, surname is spelled WILLARDE

Children of Symon Willard and Elizabeth Rode are:

1874 i. Richard Willard, born Mar 10, 1580/81 in Horsemonden, Kent, England; died Feb 18, 1615/16 in Horsemonden, Kent, England; married (1) Catherine ? WFT Est. 1589-1613; married (2) Margery Humphrey Abt. 1597 in Horsmonden, Kent, England; married (3) Joane Morebread ? Jan 17, 1608/09 in Horsmonden, Kent, ENG.

ii. Thomas Willard

iii. Thomasine Willard

iv. Female Willard

 

3750. Raynold Humphrie

Child of Raynold Humphrie is:

1875 i. Margery Humphrey, born WFT Est. 1559-1583; died WFT Est. 1607-1672; married Richard Willard Abt. 1597 in Horsmonden, Kent, England.

 

3752. Edmund Blood

Child of Edmund Blood is:

1876 i. Thomas Blood.

 

3776. Henry Howland Sr., born 1564 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died May 17, 1635 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He married 3777. Ann Margaret Aires Abt. 1600 in Ely, Cambridge, England.

3777. Ann Margaret Aires, born 1562 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died Jul 31, 1629 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England.

More About Henry Howland Sr.:

Event: Henry was fined for entertaining Quakers, at the Court of March 1658

Children of Henry Sr. and Ann Aires are:

1888 i. Henry Howland, born Nov 25, 1604 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died Jan 17, 1670/71 in Duxbury, Plymouth, Mass; married Mary Newland.

ii. John Howland, born Abt. 1592 in Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died Feb 24, 1672/73 in Plymouth, Massachusetts; married Elizabeth Tilly WFT Est. 1619-1650; born 1607 in Henlow, Bedford, England; died Dec 31, 1687 in Swansea, Massachusetts.

Notes for John Howland:

John Howland was born in 1592 at Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He was the son of Henry Howland. He came aboard the MAYFLOWER listed as a "servant" to John Carver. In midAtlantic, during a storm, Howland was swept overboard, but he caught a topsail halyard which hung over the side and was hauled back on board ship.

About 1624 John Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, also a MAYFLOWER passenger, who had lost her parents during the great sickness that befell the Pilgrims during their first winter at Plymouth.

Descent from John Howland has been proven through all ten of his children. He was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact.

John Howland was prominent in the public affairs of the Colony, serving several times as an Assistant Governor, and in 1634 was in command of the Pilgrims' trading post on the Kennebec River in Maine. He died on 24 February 1672/3. His will and inventory of estate are on record at Plymouth. His wife Elizabeth died on 21 December 1687 at Swansea.

 

 

More About John Howland:

Event: 13th signer of the Mayflower Compact

iii. Arthur Howland

iv. Humphrey Howland

v. Margaret Howland

 

3778. William Newland He married 3779. Agnes Greenway.

3779. Agnes Greenway

Children of William Newland and Agnes Greenway are:

1889 i. Mary Newland, died Jun 17, 1674; married Henry Howland.

ii. William Newland

More About William Newland:

Religion: Quaker

 

3780. Lawrence Sampson

Child of Lawrence Sampson is:

1890 i. Abraham Sampson, married Esther Nash.

 

3782. Samuel Nash

Child of Samuel Nash is:

1891 i. Esther Nash, married Abraham Sampson.

 

3808. Peter Cushing, born 1560 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Mar 02, 1614/15 in Hingham, Norfolk, England. He was the son of 7616. Thomas Cushing. He married 3809. Susan Hawes Jun 02, 1583 in Hardingham, England.

3809. Susan Hawes, born Abt. 1563 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Apr 26, 1641 in Hingham, Norfolk, England.

Notes for Peter Cushing:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

More About Peter Cushing:

Religion: He was probably one of the first Cushings to embrace the Protestant faith

Children of Peter Cushing and Susan Hawes are:

i. Theophilus Cushing, born Nov 04, 1584; died WFT Est. 1585-1674.

ii. Bridget Cushing, born Feb 19, 1585/86; died WFT Est. 1631-1681; married George More Jul 15, 1627; born WFT Est. 1571-1607; died WFT Est. 1631-1691.

iii. William Cushing, born Apr 01, 1593 in Hingham, England; died WFT Est. 1624-1683; married Margery WFT Est. 1624-1658; born WFT Est. 1589-1609; died WFT Est. 1624-1693.

iv. Barbara Cushing, born Jun 16, 1596; died Jan 1631/32.

v. Peter Cushing, born WFT Est. 1566-1606 in Hingham, England; died Jan 02, 1654/55 in London, England; married Godly Payne WFT Est. 1602-1641; born WFT Est. 1566-1612; died Apr 11, 1675 in London, England.

vi. Katherine Cushing, born WFT Est. 1566-1606; died WFT Est. 1599-1688; married Long WFT Est. 1599-1640; born WFT Est. 1558-1604 in Carlton Road near Wymondham/Norfolk; died WFT Est. 1599-1683.

vii. Thomas Cushing, born May 15, 1603; died Aug 10, 1669 in London, England.

1904 viii. Matthew Cushing, born Mar 02, 1588/89 in Hardingham, England; died Sep 30, 1660 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married Nazareth Pitcher Aug 15, 1613.

 

3832. Robert Tower, died May 01, 1634 in Hingham, England. He married 3833. Dorothy Damon Aug 31, 1607.

3833. Dorothy Damon, died Nov 10, 1629 in England.

Child of Robert Tower and Dorothy Damon is:

1916 i. John Tower, born May 17, 1609 in Hingham, England; died Feb 13, 1699/00 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married Margaret Ibrook Feb 16, 1638/39 in Charlestow, Suffolk , Massachusetts.

 

3834. Richard Ibrook, born Abt. 1580 in Southwold, Suffolk, England; died Nov 04, 1651 in Hingham, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He married 3835. Margaret Clark.

3835. Margaret Clark, born 1589 in Wymondham, England; died Apr 04, 1664 in Hingham, Massachusetts.

Notes for Richard Ibrook:

Richard - came to New England in 1635 and settled at Hingham.

Granted an Island in the Harbor in 1647. Granted four acres of land in Hingham on Broad Cove (later Lincoln Street) in 1635.

Richard was bailiff of Southwold in 1614, 1624, and 1635.

"Richard, whose name appears among the settlers of Hing. in 1635, had the same yr. a grant of land containing four acres on Broad Cover (Lincoln) St., which adjoined the lots granted to John Plamer, William Cockerum, or Cockram, and Rev. Peter Hobart."

from Massachusetts Pioneers - IBROOK

Richard, Hingham, propr. 1635, in connection with William Cockraine, Sen., his son-in-law. Before Gen. Court 5 (1) 1638-9. Ch. Rebecca, (m. Mr. Peter Hobart, widower, and d. 7 (7) 1693, ae. 72 years,) Ellen, (m. at Cambridge, March, 1638, Capt. Joshua Hobart,) Margaret, (m. at Charlestown, Feb. 13, 1638-9, John Tower of Hing.). Hob.

He d. Nor. 14, 1651.

Robert, who, at Southold, Eng., March 25, 1657, witnessed a deed of Wm. Cock-raine, Suff. De. I, 62, may be supposed to be a relation of the above.

 

More About Richard Ibrook:

Immigrated: 1635

Children of Richard Ibrook and Margaret Clark are:

i. John Ibrook, born 1607; died 1607.

ii. Elizabeth Ibrook, born 1608; died Sep 09, 1693 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married Rev. Peter Hobart 1638; born Abt. 1610.

iii. Christian Ibrook, born 1611.

iv. Thomas Ibrook, born 1615.

v. Anne Ibrook, born 1617.

1917 vi. Margaret Ibrook, born Sep 03, 1620 in Southwold, Suffolk Co, England; died May 15, 1700 in Hingham, Massachusetts; married John Tower Feb 16, 1638/39 in Charlestow, Suffolk , Massachusetts.

vii. Rebecca Ibrook, born 1621.

viii. Ellen Ibrook, born 1622; died 1700; married Joshua Hobart 1638; born Abt. 1610.

ix. Matthew Ibrook, born 1626.

 

3838. Jonathan Benson

Child of Jonathan Benson is:

1919 i. Eunice Benson, married John Hardin.

 

3840. John Hibbert Sr, born Abt. 1575 in Salisbury (Hampshire) England; died Abt. 1612. He was the son of 7680. Henry Hibbard Sr. He married 3841. Joane Fairfeild Jan 11 in St. Edmund, Salisbury (Hampshire) England.

3841. Joane Fairfeild, born 1593 in Holm Mylme, Leek, (Wiltshire) England. She was the daughter of 7682. John Fairfeild.

Child of John Sr and Joane Fairfeild is:

1920 i. Robert Hibbert, born Abt. 1613 in Salisbury, England; died May 07, 1684 in Beverly, Massachusetts; married Joanna Luff 1640 in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony.

 

3842. John Luff, born Abt. 1585 in England; died 1667 in Salem, Essex, MA. He married 3843. Bridget.

3843. Bridget

Child of John Luff and Bridget is:

1921 i. Joanna Luff, born 1614 in Salem, Massachusetts; died Apr 06, 1696; married Robert Hibbert 1640 in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony.

 

3844. William Walden He married 3845. Catherine Ranen.

3845. Catherine Ranen

Child of William Walden and Catherine Ranen is:

1922 i. Edward Walden, married <Unnamed>.

 

3848. Thomas Graves, born Bef. 1585 in England; died Nov 1662 in Hatfield, Massachusetts. He married 3849. Sarah WFT Est. 1616-1647.

3849. Sarah, born WFT Est. 1583-1609 in England; died Abt. 1666.

Child of Thomas Graves and Sarah is:

1924 i. John Graves, born WFT Est. 1608-1641 in England; died Sep 19, 1677 in Hatfield, Massachusetts; married Mary Smith Abt. 1652.

 

3850. Samuel Smith, born 1602 in Ipswich, England, England; died Jan 17, 1680/81 in Hadley, Hampshire, England. He was the son of 7700. Samuel Smith and 7701. Barbary Munforde. He married 3851. Elizabeth Chileab WFT Est. 1633-1665.

3851. Elizabeth Chileab, born WFT Est. 1587-1613 in Whatfield, Suffolk, England; died Mar 16, 1684/85 in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts.

More About Samuel Smith:

Christening: Oct 09, 1628, Hadleigh, Suffolk, England

Child of Samuel Smith and Elizabeth Chileab is:

1925 i. Mary Smith, born Abt. 1630 in England, Suffolk, Eng; died Dec 16, 1668 in Hadley, Hampshire, MA; married John Graves Abt. 1652.

 

3872. John Eastman, died Oct 22, 1602. He was the son of 7744. Roger Eastman. He married 3873. Anna.

3873. Anna

Child of John Eastman and Anna is:

1936 i. Roger Eastman, married Sarah Smith.

 

3880. William Peasley, born Abt. 1612; died WFT Est. 1643-1703. He married 3881. Anne Calvert WFT Est. 1643-1678.

3881. Anne Calvert, born Abt. 1612 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1643-1706. She was the daughter of 7762. George Calvert and 7763. Anne Wynne.

Child of William Peasley and Anne Calvert is:

1940 i. Joseph Peaslee, born WFT Est. 1593-1623 in Newbury, Essex, Ma.; died Dec 03, 1660 in Salisbury, Essex, MA; married Mary Johnson WFT Est. 1636-1656.

 

3882. John Johnson, born Abt. 1575 in Wales; died 1659 in Massachusetts. He was the son of 7764. Edmund Johnson.

Notes for John Johnson:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!NAME: A Passel O' Peasleys compiled by Frederick J. Lamphere, v1,pt1 (1979)

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!NAME: A Passel O' Peasleys compiled by Frederick J. Lamphere, v1,pt1 (1979)

Child of John Johnson is:

1941 i. Mary Johnson, born 1604 in Of Haverhill, Essex, MA; died Sep 27, 1694 in Havervill, Essex, Massachusetts; married Joseph Peaslee WFT Est. 1636-1656.

Child of John Johnson and Hannah Throckmarten is:

Generation No. 13

7424. Thomas Laughton, born 1541; died 1544. He was the son of 14848. Robert Laughton.

Child of Thomas Laughton is:

3712 i. Richard Laughton.

 

7496. Richard Willard He was the son of 14992. William Willard and 14993. Joan.

Child of Richard Willard is:

3748 i. Symon Willard, born Abt. 1584 in Horsmonden, Kent, England; died Feb 26, 1583/84 in Goudhurst, Kent, England; married Elizabeth Rode Abt. 1560 in Horsmonden, Kent, England.

 

7616. Thomas Cushing, born 1512 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Apr 1558 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England. He was the son of 15232. John Cushing.

More About Thomas Cushing:

Fact 1: Inherited his father's homestead and all the lands therein

Children of Thomas Cushing are:

i. John Cushing, born 1538 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Oct 21, 1581 in Knapton, Norfolk, England.

ii. Nicholas Cushing, born 1540 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1541-1630.

iii. Stephen Cushing, born 1542 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1543-1632.

iv. Ursula Cushing, born 1564 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1565-1658.

v. Edward Cushing, born 1566 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1567-1656.

Child of Thomas Cushing is:

3808 i. Peter Cushing, born 1560 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Mar 02, 1614/15 in Hingham, Norfolk, England; married Susan Hawes Jun 02, 1583 in Hardingham, England.

 

7680. Henry Hibbard Sr, born Abt. 1547 in England.

Children of Henry Hibbard Sr are:

3840 i. John Hibbert Sr, born Abt. 1575 in Salisbury (Hampshire) England; died Abt. 1612; married Joane Fairfeild Jan 11 in St. Edmund, Salisbury (Hampshire) England.

ii. Henry Hibbert, born Abt. 1573.

iii. Grissell Hibbert

iv. Francis Hibbert

 

7682. John Fairfeild

Child of John Fairfeild is:

3841 i. Joane Fairfeild, born 1593 in Holm Mylme, Leek, (Wiltshire) England; married John Hibbert Sr Jan 11 in St. Edmund, Salisbury (Hampshire) England.

 

7700. Samuel Smith, born WFT Est. 1566-1590 in Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng.; died WFT Est. 1606-1673 in Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng. He was the son of 15400. Samuel Smith and 15401. Mrs Samuel Smith. He married 7701. Barbary Munforde WFT Est. 1600-1632.

7701. Barbary Munforde, born WFT Est. 1560-1583; died WFT Est. 1605-1671.

More About Samuel Smith:

Christening: Jul 19, 1575, Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng.

Child of Samuel Smith and Barbary Munforde is:

3850 i. Samuel Smith, born 1602 in Ipswich, England, England; died Jan 17, 1680/81 in Hadley, Hampshire, England; married Elizabeth Chileab WFT Est. 1633-1665.

 

7744. Roger Eastman

Child of Roger Eastman is:

3872 i. John Eastman, died Oct 22, 1602; married Anna.

 

7762. George Calvert, born Abt. 1580 in Yorks, England; died 1632 in London, England. He was the son of 15524. Leonard Calvert and 15525. Anne Brent. He married 7763. Anne Wynne Abt. 1611 in Of, Yorks, England.

7763. Anne Wynne, born Abt. 1584 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1616-1678. She was the daughter of 15526. John Wynne and 15527. Elizabeth Wroth.

Child of George Calvert and Anne Wynne is:

3881 i. Anne Calvert, born Abt. 1612 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1643-1706; married William Peasley WFT Est. 1643-1678.

 

7764. Edmund Johnson, born 1562 in Wales; died 1600 in Pond, Ponta, Wales.

Notes for Edmund Johnson:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!Death: A Passel O' Peasleys compiled by Frederick J. Lamphere, v1,pt1 (1979)

[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Mary Johnson.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3084, Date of Import: May 20, 2002]

!Death: A Passel O' Peasleys compiled by Frederick J. Lamphere, v1,pt1 (1979)

Child of Edmund Johnson is:

3882 i. John Johnson, born Abt. 1575 in Wales; died 1659 in Massachusetts; married WFT Est. 1607-1639; married (2) Hannah Throckmarten WFT Est. 1608-1641.

 

Generation No. 14

14848. Robert Laughton, born 1513.

Child of Robert Laughton is:

7424 i. Thomas Laughton, born 1541; died 1544.

 

14992. William Willard, born Bet. 1470 - 1474 in Brenchley, Kent, England; died Dec 05, 1559 in Brenchley, Kent, England. He married 14993. Joan.

14993. Joan

Children of William Willard and Joan are:

7496 i. Richard Willard.

ii. Symon Willard

iii. Thomas Willard

 

15232. John Cushing, born 1470 in Hingham, Norfolk, England; died Feb 21, 1521/22 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England. He was the son of 30464. William Cushing and 30465. Emma.

Notes for John Cushing:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

John Cushing [Cushin, Cushyn], the eldest son of William and

Emma Cushing, was born in Hingham but lived in Hardingham, where he possessed estates. He also owned large properties in Lombard St., London. He is called "Gentlemen" in a survey of the Manor of Flockthorpe, in Hardingham, dated 1512. His will is dated Feb. 21, 1522, and proved Mar. 5, 1523; it mentions his wife and six children. He is mentioned in the subsidy rolls of Henry VIII, for 1523. [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

John Cushing [Cushin, Cushyn], the eldest son of William and

Emma Cushing, was born in Hingham but lived in Hardingham, where he possessed estates. He also owned large properties in Lombard St., London. He is called "Gentlemen" in a survey of the Manor of Flockthorpe, in Hardingham, dated 1512. His will is dated Feb. 21, 1522, and proved Mar. 5, 1523; it mentions his wife and six children. He is mentioned in the subsidy rolls of Henry VIII, for 1523.

Children of John Cushing are:

i. John Cushing, born 1496 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died May 11, 1539; married (1) Rose WFT Est. 1513-1534 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; born WFT Est. 1492-1511 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1513-1596; married (2) Alice Clive WFT Est. 1513-1534 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; born 1470 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1513-1565.

ii. Margaret Cushing, born 1502 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1503-1596.

iii. Isabel Cushing, born 1504 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1505-1598.

iv. William Cushing, born 1514 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1531-1604; married Joan WFT Est. 1531-1564; born WFT Est. 1510-1530; died WFT Est. 1531-1614.

v. Margery Cushing, born 1519 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1520-1613.

vi. Elyne Cushing, born 1520 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1521-1614.

vii. Agnes Cushing, born 1522 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1523-1616.

Child of John Cushing is:

7616 i. Thomas Cushing, born 1512 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Apr 1558 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; married WFT Est. 1531-1552.; married WFT Est. 1516-1556.

 

15400. Samuel Smith, born Abt. 1549 in Of Ipswich, Suffolk, England; died WFT Est. 1580-1640. He married 15401. Mrs Samuel Smith Abt. 1574 in Of, Ipswich, Suffolk, England.

15401. Mrs Samuel Smith, born Abt. 1553 in Of, Ipswich, Suffolk, England; died WFT Est. 1580-1647.

Child of Samuel Smith and Mrs Smith is:

7700 i. Samuel Smith, born WFT Est. 1566-1590 in Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng.; died WFT Est. 1606-1673 in Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng; married Barbary Munforde WFT Est. 1600-1632.

 

15524. Leonard Calvert, born Abt. 1548 in Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1584-1639. He was the son of 31048. John Calvert and 31049. Mrs John Calvert. He married 15525. Anne Brent Abt. 1579 in Yorks, England.

15525. Anne Brent, born Abt. 1552 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1584-1646. She was the daughter of 31050. Richard Brent and 31051. Elizabeth Reed.

Child of Leonard Calvert and Anne Brent is:

7762 i. George Calvert, born Abt. 1580 in Yorks, England; died 1632 in London, England; married Anne Wynne Abt. 1611 in Of, Yorks, England.

 

15526. John Wynne, born Abt. 1558; died WFT Est. 1590-1649. He married 15527. Elizabeth Wroth WFT Est. 1590-1624.

15527. Elizabeth Wroth, born Abt. 1562; died WFT Est. 1590-1656.

Child of John Wynne and Elizabeth Wroth is:

7763 i. Anne Wynne, born Abt. 1584 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1616-1678; married George Calvert Abt. 1611 in Of, Yorks, England.

 

Generation No. 15

30464. William Cushing, born Abt. 1430 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Sep 26, 1492 in Hardingham, England. He was the son of 60928. Thomas Cushing. He married 30465. Emma WFT Est. 1456-1490.

30465. Emma, born 1431 in England; died Jul 20, 1507 in Hingham, Norfolk, England.

Notes for William Cushing:

 

 

 

The eldest son and heir of Thomas Cushing. His long and explicit will was dated Sept. 26, 1492 and was proved in the Bishop's Court of Norwich, Mar. 11, 1493. In ancient deeds relating to the county of Norfolk, he is styled "Gentleman". His wife, Emma, was executrix of his will; her own was proved July 27, 1507.[Ralftree.FTW]

Born early in the fifteenth century.

Children of William Cushing and Emma are:

15232 i. John Cushing, born 1470 in Hingham, Norfolk, England; died Feb 21, 1521/22 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; married WFT Est. 1476-1535.; married 1500.

ii. Robert Cushing, born 1473 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Jul 29, 1547; married Joan Cushing WFT Est. 1491-1533 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; born WFT Est. 1471-1509 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1531-1595.

iii. Thomas Cushing, born 1475 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Jun 15, 1504; married Unknown Cushing WFT Est. 1491-1503 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; born WFT Est. 1471-1487 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1495-1574.

iv. Elyne Cushing, born 1479 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1480-1573.

v. Annable Cushing, born 1481 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1482-1575.

vi. Margaret Cushing, born 1484 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1498-1578; married Thomas Crowe WFT Est. 1498-1531 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; born WFT Est. 1467-1487 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1501-1573.

vii. Agnes Cushing, born 1486 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1487-1580.

 

31048. John Calvert, born Abt. 1515 in Yorkshire, England; died WFT Est. 1552-1606. He married 31049. Mrs John Calvert Abt. 1547 in Yorks, England.

31049. Mrs John Calvert, born Abt. 1519 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1551-1613.

Child of John Calvert and Mrs Calvert is:

15524 i. Leonard Calvert, born Abt. 1548 in Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1584-1639; married Anne Brent Abt. 1579 in Yorks, England.

 

31050. Richard Brent, born Abt. 1526; died WFT Est. 1558-1617. He married 31051. Elizabeth Reed WFT Est. 1558-1592.

31051. Elizabeth Reed, born Abt. 1530; died WFT Est. 1558-1624.

Child of Richard Brent and Elizabeth Reed is:

15525 i. Anne Brent, born Abt. 1552 in Of, Yorks, England; died WFT Est. 1584-1646; married Leonard Calvert Abt. 1579 in Yorks, England.

 

Generation No. 16

60928. Thomas Cushing, born Abt. 1390 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1415-1518. He was the son of 121856. William Cushing.

Notes for Thomas Cushing:

Born in the latter part of the reign of Richard II [1377-1399]. A deed dated 1466 contains note only his name, but also the name of his son, William. He is also named in other deeds and charters dated 1474, 1480 and 1494. He possessed large estates in Hardingham, Hingham and other parts of his native country.

 

 

 

 

More About Thomas Cushing:

Burial: Name maybe spelled Cushyn, Cusyn

Child of Thomas Cushing is:

30464 i. William Cushing, born Abt. 1430 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died Sep 26, 1492 in Hardingham, England; married Emma WFT Est. 1456-1490.

 

Generation No. 17

121856. William Cushing, born 1350 in England; died WFT Est. 1378-1488. He was the son of 243712. Galfridus Cusyn.

Notes for William Cushing:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Ralftree.FTW]

Either the son of the grandson of Galfridus Cusyn of Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England.

Born during the 14th Century.[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

He was either the son or grandson of the Galfridus Cusyn, of Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England, who is mentioned in the subsidy rolls for Norfolk in 1327. He added to the original estates in Hardingham the estates in Hingham, which were inherited by his son, Thomas. [My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Ralftree.FTW]

Either the son of the grandson of Galfridus Cusyn of Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England.

Born during the 14th Century.[18 gen.FTW]

[cushyn.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 1, Ed. 1, Tree #3857, Date of Import: Jan 10, 2002]

He was either the son or grandson of the Galfridus Cusyn, of Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England, who is mentioned in the subsidy rolls for Norfolk in 1327. He added to the original estates in Hardingham the estates in Hingham, which were inherited by his son, Thomas.

Child of William Cushing is:

60928 i. Thomas Cushing, born Abt. 1390 in Hardingham, Norfolk, England; died WFT Est. 1415-1518; married WFT Est. 1396-1428 in England.

 

Generation No. 18

243712. Galfridus Cusyn, born Bet. 1327 - 1355 in Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England. He was the son of 487424. Roger Cosyn.

Child of Galfridus Cusyn is:

121856 i. William Cushing, born 1350 in England; died WFT Est. 1378-1488; married WFT Est. 1366-1444.

 

Generation No. 19

487424. Roger Cosyn He was the son of 974848. Ralf Le Cusyn de Limisi.

Notes for Roger Cosyn:

[Master Tree.FTW]

[Ralftree.FTW]

Born in the latter part of the 13th century.[My Entire Tree2.FTW]

[Ralftree.FTW]

Born in the latter part of the 13th century.

Child of Roger Cosyn is:

243712 i. Galfridus Cusyn, born Bet. 1327 - 1355 in Hardingham, Norfolk Co., England.

 

Generation No. 20

974848. Ralf Le Cusyn de Limisi He was the son of Gerard De Limisi and Amy De Hornelade.

Notes for Ralf Le Cusyn de Limisi:

Ralf Le Cusyn (or Le Cosyn) de Limisi is said to have been a younger son of Gerard De Limisi, brother of John De Limisi, since he is found holding Choseley in the land party of England about this time, and since his arms, with merely a change of tincture, were the same as those of the De Limisis. From him were Roger and Richard Cosyn, from one of whom (probably the former) Galfridus Cusyn was descended.

Children of Ralf Le Cusyn de Limisi are:

487424 i. Roger Cosyn.

ii. Richard Cusyn Cosyn

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